Friday, 19 July 2019

Guidance on use of data for innovation

Guidance on use of data for innovation The Department of Health and Social Care has issued guidance on how the NHS should engage with researchers and innovators when entering into data sharing arrangements.

The department has promised to set up a national centre of excellence assist in the development of data sharing agreements.

Music 'calms nerves before surgery' as well as sedative

Music 'calms nerves before surgery' as well as sedative Listening to the "world's most relaxing song" before an operation could be just as good at calming patients' nerves as medication, US researchers say.

The song, written to reduce anxiety, blood pressure and heart rate, performed as well as a sedative in a study of 157 people.

But patients said they would have preferred to choose their own music. BBC News

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Capita admits further cervical screening administration errors

Capita admits further cervical screening administration errors Capita has admitted that correspondence relating to cervical screening was not processed properly due to an administrative error.

The private company, which runs the NHS's Primary Care Support England service, revealed in a statement that the error caused a delay to 16 women being invited to screening - but insisted no harm was caused. Pulse

Thousands go missing from mental health hospitals in England each year

Thousands go missing from mental health hospitals in England each year Thousands of patients went missing from mental health hospitals in England last year, NHS figures show.

A total of 3,462 people who had been sectioned under the Mental Health Act went AWOL - absent without leave - from facilities between April 2018 and March 2019.

This is a 4.4% rise on the previous year during which 3,316 patients went missing. Sky News

'Vaccine hesitant': a gentler label than anti-vaxxer, but just as scary

'Vaccine hesitant': a gentler label than anti-vaxxer, but just as scary Reluctant parents who keep their opinions on jabs to themselves have been called a global threat by the World Health Organisation

This week we learned that parents who are unsure whether to have their children vaccinated against dangerous diseases are in the grip of “vaccine hesitancy”, a term that first appeared in print in 2008 but is becoming distressingly more common. It is not clear whether there is a symmetrically opposed group who are “vaccine curious”, but to call such waverers “hesitant” is at least gentler than calling them “deniers”. The Guardian

NHS flu jabs delayed amid scramble to keep up with 'Aussie' strain 

NHS flu jabs delayed amid scramble to keep up with 'Aussie' strain The NHS is scrambling to get hold of the right flu jabs in time for this winter, amid fears millions of Britons will not be protected against a deadly “Aussie” strain.

Health officials say delays by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in selecting the vaccine for this winter mean that some jabs will not be delivered to GP practices until the end of November.

Normally flu vaccinations are offered by the NHS from September. The Daily Telegraph

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Relaxing salt regulations in ready meals 'caused 9,9000 cases of heart disease'

Relaxing salt regulations in ready meals 'caused 9,9000 cases of heart disease' Relaxing salt regulations in the UK has been linked to thousands of cases of heart disease and stomach cancer that would never have otherwise occurred, research suggests.

A study looked at salt intake in England before and after changes to legislation were introduced in 2011.

The 'tragic' Public Health Responsibility Deal saw the food industry set its own salt targets, rather than being monitored by an independent body. The Daily Mail

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Thursday, 18 July 2019

Report of the survey of liaison psychiatry in England

Report of the survey of liaison psychiatry in England This is the fourth Liaison Psychiatry survey of England. It concerns the Liaison Psychiatry services in acute hospitals with Emergency Departments in England. NHS England

Enhancing the experience of doctors - new reports from HEE

Enhancing the experience of doctors - new reports from HEE Health Education England (HEE) has published two new reports setting out their commitment to improve the experience of doctors across the NHS through enhanced supervision and better support for transition in and out of foundation training.

We encourage employers to review both reports and understand the impact this will have on how they deliver training and support supervision. NHS Employers

Driving improvement through technology

Driving improvement through technology Technology in health and care services is growing in importance. Digitally-enabled care can offer significant benefits to people who use services and those who run and deliver them. These case studies illustrate some of the developments in use and testing. Care Quality Commission

    Child mental health unit referrals 'up nearly 50%'

    Child mental health unit referrals 'up nearly 50%' Referrals to child mental health units from UK primary schools for pupils aged 11 and under have risen by nearly 50% in three years, the BBC has learned.

    Replies to Freedom of Information (FOI) requests from 46 health trusts indicate they rose from 21,125 to 31,531.

    Seven trusts said they had rejected an individual pupil for treatment at least five times over the last four years.

    The government says it is "determined to improve mental health support". BBC News

    Children with gender identity issues 'need help from all sides'

    Children with gender identity issues 'need help from all sides' Solving gender identity issues in children is complicated, and is not always going to be the answer to everything, says NHS England's gender identity development service.

    They need help "from all sides", say experts from the London clinic, because many of the under-18s are also dealing with mental health problems.

    Referrals to the service have more than tripled since 2014-15 - to 2,590.

    Fewer than half decided to have any physical treatments. BBC News

    Trieste’s mental health revolution: 'It’s the best place to get sick'

    Trieste’s mental health revolution: 'It’s the best place to get sick' Sara has struggled with her mental health since she was a child.

    She lives in Trieste, where ideas from a mental health 'revolution' in the 1970s are helping her recover today. BBC News

    Safety concerns raised about software used to triage NHS 111 calls

    Safety concerns raised about software used to triage NHS 111 calls Coroners have linked 11 patient deaths with safety concerns about NHS Pathways, the clinical software used to triage patients calls to the NHS 111 and 999 services.

    An investigation by the Health Service Journal (HSJ) revealed that coroners have issued ‘regulation 28’ reports calling on the NHS and Department of Health and Social Care, to take action to prevent future fatalities. Healthcare IT News

    One in 20 patients exposed to preventable harm in medical care

    One in 20 patients exposed to preventable harm in medical care Around one in 20 patients are exposed to preventable harm in medical care – and one in eight of these cases are severe or led to death – even though early detection and prevention of patient harm in healthcare is an international policy priority, UK-led research published today in The BMJ has revealed. The researchers behind the study called for mitigation of major sources of preventable patient harm such as drug incidents, for evidence to be properly recorded across specialties including primary care and psychiatry, and for better assessment and reporting standards. OnMedica

    Cheap flights blamed as skin cancer rates soar by 45 per cent in a decade

    Cheap flights blamed as skin cancer rates soar by 45 per cent in a decade Rates of melanoma skin cancers have soared by 45 per cent in the past decade as cheap international flights have fuelled a new generation of sun chasers, charities have warned.

    Melanomas are rarer but more serious than non-melanoma skin cancers and rates have risen most steeply among men and the under-50s, a Cancer Research UK analysis found. The Independent

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    Cuts to study of killings by mental health patients ‘put people at risk’

    Cuts to study of killings by mental health patients ‘put people at risk’ NHS England decision is risky and reckless, experts and victims’ families say

    People have been put at risk because the NHS has stopped funding the automatic investigation of all killings by mental health patients, according to psychiatrists and victims’ families.

    Experts who had looked into every such homicide for 20 years had to stop doing so last year after NHS England stopped paying the £100,000-a-year cost involved, the Guardian has learned. The Guardian

    Obesity should be classed as a disease to remove the stigma it is 'self-inflicted' medics say

    Obesity should be classed as a disease to remove the stigma it is 'self-inflicted' medics say Obesity should be classed as a disease to remove the stigma that it is "self-inflicted" and encourage those with weight problems to get help, medics have said.

    Writing in the BMJ, they said that up to 70 per cent of weight variability was inherited, with 200 genes linked to it.

    And they said the rise in obesity was due to “an altered environment” which meant cheap food was readily available. The Daily Telegraph

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    'Anti-vaxxer' parents face £2,000 fines as Germany makes measles vaccinations compulsory

    'Anti-vaxxer' parents face £2,000 fines as Germany makes measles vaccinations compulsory Germany is to make measles vaccinations compulsory for all children from next year amid concern at the rise in infections.

    Angela Merkel’s cabinet agreed on Wednesday to make vaccinations mandatory at all schools and kindergartens. As school is compulsory in Germany and home schooling is not permitted, parents will be obliged to vaccinate their children. The Daily Telegraph

    Wednesday, 17 July 2019

    East Midlands Ambulance Service: Trust makes 'significant improvements'

    East Midlands Ambulance Service: Trust makes 'significant improvements' A previously-troubled ambulance service has made significant improvements, a regulator has found.

    East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust has been rated "good" by the Care Quality Commission (CQC), after being told in 2017 changes were needed.

    Inspectors found the service had new ways of call handling, which helped staff better deal with major incidents.

    The trust was rated as outstanding for being "caring", one of the CQC's key grading areas. BBC Northampton

    New campaign to fund Wellingborough A&E facility

    New campaign to fund Wellingborough A&E facility 'Wellingborough needs its own A&E facility'.

    That's the message from campaigners battling to bring urgent care provision to Northamptonshire's fourth biggest town.

    Currently those in need of immediate medical attention in Wellingborough face a nine-mile trip to Kettering General Hospital, a 12-mile trip to Northampton General Hospital or, further afield, a 16-mile trip to Corby Urgent Care Centre. Northamptonshire Telegraph

    Funding innovation in the NHS: Early observations of a Wave 2 Test Bed

    Funding innovation in the NHS: Early observations of a Wave 2 Test Bed Since last September the Nuffield Trust has been evaluating Care City, a Test Bed based in north east London. Sophie Castle-Clarke describes what we’ve found so far.

    Ensuring that the NHS can make the most of new, well-evidenced technologies is a policy priority. The Test Bed programme is an initiative that tries to do just that. It brings NHS organisations and industry partners together to test combinations of digital technologies with new ways of delivering services in real-world settings, and provides funding for them to do so. The ultimate ambition is to harness the potential of these technologies to improve the delivery of health care and the sustainability of services. Nuffield Trust

    Can less be more? The new approach to social care in South Tyneside

    Can less be more? The new approach to social care in South Tyneside As our new report on the Wigan Deal illustrates, local authorities are increasingly adopting approaches to social care that aim to minimise the need for formal support by focusing on the resources already available to people in their families and communities. It’s an approach that requires a closer, better understanding of the individual, their strengths, their resilience and the assets around them, and – as the report suggests – there is reason to believe it could improve not just community-based social care, but also areas such as hospital discharge. The King's Fund

    Alzheimer's risk 'different in women and men'

    Alzheimer's risk 'different in women and men' Scientists say they may have discovered why more women than men have Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

    It has always been thought that women living longer than men was the reason.

    But new research presented at an international conference suggests this may not be the whole story.

    Differences in brain connectivity and sex-specific genes linked to risk could explain the numbers, the researchers say. BBC News

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    Number of stroke doctors needs to rise by a third – report - ITV News

    Number of stroke doctors needs to rise by a third – report Stroke survivors living with a disability will rise by a third by 2035, doctors have said as they warned the UK needs far more specialists in stroke medicine.

    The British Association of Stroke Physicians (BASP) said there is a “significant and growing shortage of stroke consultants” in the UK, with around four in 10 hospitals providing stroke care having an unfilled consultant post – compared to less than three in 10 (26%) in 2014.

    In its report, BASP said immediate access to procedures such as intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy, which dissolve clots and restore blood flow to the brain, can significantly decrease the risk of long-term disability and save millions of pounds in long-term health and social care costs. ITV News

    Conflicting healthy eating advice leaving public ‘clueless’, poll suggests

    Conflicting healthy eating advice leaving public ‘clueless’, poll suggests Mixed messages over “healthy” diets are causing “significant” confusion among UK fitness fanatics, according to a study.

    Conflicting expert reports over what is right and wrong means the vast majority of regular exercisers do not know if the food they eat is really doing them any good.

    Eight in 10 admit they are “clueless” over the nutritional benefits of different food types – and have no idea what they should be consuming in order to bulk up or slim down. The Independent

    No, Boris Johnson, working harder is not a solution for poor mental health

    No, Boris Johnson, working harder is not a solution for poor mental health | Arwa Mahdawi Offering tax incentives to companies who support depressed employees sounds like a step towards privatising the NHS

    Boris Johnson is quite the renaissance man. He builds buses! He writes columns! He dabbles in politics! And now, it would appear, he fancies himself a mental health expert. On Sunday, Johnson used his Telegraph column to share his brilliant solution to Britain’s mental health crisis: drown out your inner demons with work. Yep, according to the sentient shock of hair that will probably be Britain’s next prime minister, you can rid yourself of depression by working harder. The Guardian

    English health index to paint detailed picture of nation’s wellbeing

    English health index to paint detailed picture of nation’s wellbeing Database will be used to assess effect of policies as focus shifts to preventing illness

    The government is to set up the most comprehensive database yet to measure the health of people in England as part of leaked plans to improve life expectancy and boost the fight against the biggest deadly diseases.

    Ministers intend to create a “composite health index” which will track whether the population’s health is getting better or worse and the stark difference between rich and poor when it comes to illnesses such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease. The Guardian

    People given financial rewards to quit smoking are '50 per cent more likely to kick the habit'

    People given financial rewards to quit smoking are '50 per cent more likely to kick the habit' People are significantly more likely to quit smoking if they get money for doing so, a study has revealed.

    Researchers found quitters who were motivated with financial rewards are 50 per cent more likely to have kicked the habit after six months.

    They said the NHS could save billions of pounds by using these incentives, such as cash or vouchers, to halt people's deadly addictions.

    Interestingly, the amount of money people were getting didn't seem to make a difference. The Daily Mail

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    Tuesday, 16 July 2019

    Meaningful measures of integration

    Meaningful measures of integration The NHS long-term plan confirmed, once again, that collaboration is now the organising principle of the NHS, and that integrated care is the idea on which national leaders have pinned their hopes. There have been a number of initiatives to integrate services over the past decade, but the pace picked up considerably with the appointment of Simon Stevens as the Chief Executive of NHS England in 2014 and the publication of the NHS five year forward view. If anything will define his legacy when he eventually steps down, it will be the success or otherwise of this. The King's Fund

    National training surveys 2019: initial findings report

    National training surveys 2019: initial findings report More than 75,000 doctors in training and trainers took part in this year's GMC surveys. This initial findings report outlines the key trends across the UK. General Medical Council

      Social care: paying for care home places and domiciliary care (England)

      Social care: paying for care home places and domiciliary care (England) This updated briefing paper considers the current structure of the care home market in England, as well as issues facing the sector and how private clients (“self-funders”) tend to pay more than local authority funded residents (known as “cross-subsidisation”). House of Commons Library

        Scotland's drug deaths set to top 1,000

        Scotland's drug deaths set to top 1,000 New figures released later are expected to show that more than 1,000 people died as a result of drugs in Scotland last year.

        Scotland already has the worst record for reported drug overdose deaths in Europe but the latest figures will show another steep rise.

        Last week, Scottish Public Health Minister Joe Fitzpatrick said the level of drug deaths was an "emergency".

        He told MPs this should be a "wake-up call" over UK government policy. BBC News

        NHS litigation bill rises while claim number remains steady

        NHS litigation bill rises while claim number remains steady Latest figures show the cost of clinical negligence claims is continuing to rise despite a flattening of the number of claims, prompting medical defence bodies to urge the UK government to hasten reform of the legal processes.


        In its annual report NHS Resolution says that provision for claims indemnified had increased by £6.4bn to a record high of £83.4bn as of 31 March 2019. OnMedica

        Rough sleepers denied access to healthcare, pushing them into ‘repeat cycles of homelessness’, study says

        Rough sleepers denied access to healthcare, pushing them into ‘repeat cycles of homelessness’, study says Homeless people are being denied access to basic healthcare, according to research which suggests “perceived stigma and discrimination” in health settings are pushing people with no fixed abode into “repeat cycles of homelessness” and causing “unnecessary deaths”.

        A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham found homeless people were being denied registration at GP surgeries and discharged from hospital onto the streets with no referral to primary care providers. The Independent

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        Britons and their unborn children at risk due to government inaction over toxic chemicals in everyday use, MPs warn

        Britons and their unborn children at risk due to government inaction over toxic chemicals in everyday use, MPs warn Ministers are ignoring a ‘cocktail of toxic chemicals’ in furniture, food packaging and children’s prams which could harm the health of Britons, even before they’re born, MPs have warned.

        A damning report by the Commons Environmental Audit Committee has accused the government of “sitting on its hands” and allowing chemicals which may be hazardous to health to enter people’s homes. The Independent

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        Anorexia may originate in the body, not just the mind, groundbreaking study says

        Anorexia may originate in the body, not just the mind, groundbreaking study says Anorexia may not be a purely psychological illness, according to a new study which suggests for the first time sufferers’ metabolism may play an equally important role.

        An international team of researchers found people who develop anorexia are genetically predisposed to have an increased metabolic rate, less body fat and higher physical activity.

        It had been assumed that these physical differences were a consequence of people with anorexia starving themselves. The Independent

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        The Guardian view on policing youth violence: knives are a public health issue | Editorial

        The Guardian view on policing youth violence: knives are a public health issue | Editorial Ministers and the mayor of London have embraced a new approach. But breaking the cycle will take resources as well as ideas

        When the Guardian embarked on a project to investigate the rising number of children and teenagers being stabbed in 2017, our reporters expected to encounter people traumatised by extreme violence. The loss of a child or young person is always hard to bear, but when they have died as the result of deliberate aggression, the anger and regret of those left behind can be overwhelming. The series, Beyond the Blade, sought to tell the stories of these victims in more detail than they are usually afforded. It also looked for the patterns that underlay the rise in this form of crime. The Guardian

        Coroners link eleven deaths to glitches in NHS 111 and 999 systems 

        Coroners link eleven deaths to glitches in NHS 111 and 999 systems The deaths of eleven patients, including two young children, have been linked to glitches in the algorithms used by the NHS 111 and 999 services.

        Coroners have issued warnings about the “triaging” system after a catalogue of safety concerns.

        The “prevention of future death” reports were issued because of fears the tragedies would be repeated, without swift action to improve the service and reduce the risk of fatal errors. The Daily Telegraph

        New superbug tsar tells of her fear that children will grow up in a 'post-antibiotic apocalypse'

        New superbug tsar tells of her fear that children will grow up in a 'post-antibiotic apocalypse' Britain is sleepwalking into a 'post-antibiotic apocalypse' which would see grave setbacks in our ability to fight disease, the new superbug tsar has warned.

        Professor Dame Sally Davies used her appointment as the UK's special envoy on antimicrobial resistance to make an emotional plea for leaders to sit up and tackle the looming drug crisis.

        She painted a frightening picture of a 'return to the dark ages' of healthcare if we continue to gobble up existing antibiotics without finding replacements. The Daily Mail

        Monday, 15 July 2019

        New roles to help take pressure off GPs

        New roles to help take pressure off GPs A Northamptonshire doctor has welcomed the launch of a new role that will support patients to link up with community and healthcare services as he says GPs are ‘just about on their knees’.

        In the biggest shake-up within doctors surgeries for 15 years, GP groups from across the county have formed 16 new primary care networks who will share a group of new professionals.

        Each network will have a social prescriber whose role is to link up patients who may be socially isolated or have long-term physical or mental health conditions, with services that can help improve their lives. Northamptonshire Telegraph

        'We will back you': a positive approach to risk

        'We will back you': a positive approach to risk On a Thursday afternoon last October I found myself in a community centre in Wigan, listening to an anthropologist explaining the value of cows to a tribe in Africa. I knew they were doing things differently in Wigan, but I hadn’t expected this. The King's Fund

        Obesity crisis: Type 2 diabetes in children up by nearly half in five years

        Obesity crisis: Type 2 diabetes in children up by nearly half in five years The number of children and young people being treated for Type 2 diabetes, a condition normally seen only in older adults and often linked to obesity, has rocketed by nearly 50 per cent in just five years, new analysis by the Local Government Association reveals.

        Latest figures obtained by the LGA, which represents councils in England and Wales, show there were almost 750 cases of those aged under 25 who received care for Type 2 diabetes from Paediatric Diabetes Units in 2017/18. The first cases of Type 2 diabetes in children were diagnosed less than 20 years ago.

        Councils, which are responsible for public health, says this highlights the urgent need to tackle one of the nation’s biggest health challenges in childhood obesity.

        See also:

        Westminster power vacuum leaves NHS struggling

        Westminster power vacuum leaves NHS struggling A Conservative leadership contest and uncertainty over a new Downing Street regime - not to mention Brexit - have left Whitehall in the doldrums.

        That isn't just an academic issue - it affects real lives. Critical decisions on social care and health policy in England have been put on hold, with ministers and civil servants unable to reach difficult decisions in the current political vacuum.

        First, the NHS - some hospitals are reporting record patient numbers coming through accident and emergency departments in June and this month. BBC News

        Dementia risk linked to healthy lifestyle

        Dementia risk linked to healthy lifestyle Nearly everyone can lower their risk of dementia, even if it runs in the family, by living a healthy lifestyle, research suggests.

        The study of nearly 200,000 people showed the risk fell by up to a third.

        The team at the University of Exeter said the results were exciting, empowering and showed people were not doomed to get dementia.

        The findings were revealed at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. BBC News

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        Warning issued over adrenaline pen fault

        Warning issued over adrenaline pen fault Allergy patients are being warned of a potential fault with Emerade adrenaline pens.

        The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said some have blocked needles, so cannot deliver adrenaline.

        Around two in every 1,000 pens are thought to be affected. BBC News

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        Patients ‘in pain and distress’ forced to postpone treatment as NHS six-month waits hit new record

        Patients ‘in pain and distress’ forced to postpone treatment as NHS six-month waits hit new record The number of NHS patients forced to wait more than six months for treatment has hit an all-time high while A&E’s performance has reached its worst June levels on record, official figures show.

        Health service performance figures for May show 245,079 people spent more than 26 weeks on the waiting list, with experts warning many will be “in pain and distress”.

        A heatwave last summer led to unprecedented pressures in the NHS which sapped trusts' time to prepare for winter and there are warning signs this summer could be even worse. The Independent

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        Lack of homes suitable for older people fuels housing crisis – report

        Lack of homes suitable for older people fuels housing crisis – report Failure to plan for ageing population will also add to pressure on health and care services

        England’s small towns are set to swell with increasing numbers of elderly people as they reject city living amid a hidden housing crisis caused by a lack of appropriate homes for a rapidly ageing population, a new study reveals.

        Bexhill in East Sussex, Corby in Northamptonshire and Denton in Greater Manchester are forecast to see the biggest increases in populations aged 55 and above during the next two decades, according to the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Centre for Towns think tank. The Guardian

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        Government to issue 'sleep hygiene' guidance

        Government to issue 'sleep hygiene' guidance Leaked draft says less than seven hours’ sleep can damage mental and physical health

        The government could give people guidance on how much sleep they need each night, according to reports.

        A leaked draft of a public health green paper, due to be published by the health secretary, Matt Hancock, says the government will review the evidence on sleep and health. It suggests the minimum amount will vary depending on how old someone is, and the paper will give advice on “sleep hygiene”, according to the Times, which obtained the document. The Guardian

        Syphilis cases in Europe have shot up 70% since 2010

        Syphilis cases in Europe have shot up 70% since 2010 Syphilis cases have soared by 70 per cent in Europe since 2010, data shows.

        A report reveals the sexually transmitted infection (STI) reached an all-time high in 2017, with 33,189 confirmed cases in 28 countries across the continent.

        This is an increase of more than 13,000 from the 19,797 reported incidences in 2007.

        Although an issue throughout Europe, cases of the STI more than doubled between 2010 and 2017 in five countries, including Britain. The Daily Mail

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        Health Secretary Matt Hancock pleads with doctors not to retire early over the NHS pension crisis

        Health Secretary Matt Hancock pleads with doctors not to retire early over the NHS pension crisis Health Secretary Matt Hancock is pleading with doctors not to retire early because of the NHS pension crisis.

        Many medics are trying to avoid big tax bills from stricter pension rules that put a cap on their saving allowances.

        Mr Hancock has reassured big earners within the health service that changes to the lifetime allowance will be 'fixed' before April.

        In the meantime, he is asking the consultants and managers to 'take no precipitate action in terms of early retirement'. The Daily Mail

        Friday, 12 July 2019

        Guidance: Childhood flu programme: information for healthcare practitioners

        Guidance: Childhood flu programme: information for healthcare practitioners This document on the flu vaccination and vaccination programme includes information on:
        • what flu is
        • the flu vaccine
        • dosage
        • administering the vaccine
        • advice on vaccinating children with an egg allergy
        • further resources
        View and download the accompanying childhood flu programme 2019 training slideset. Public Health England

        Care of neurological patients found wanting

        Care of neurological patients found wanting A report from the Neurological Alliance says that the experiences of neurological patients remain poor.  Neuro Patience presents the findings of the 2018/19 National Neurology Patient Experience Survey. The report covers three main themes – accessible, personalised and holistic care and support (which includes social care, mental health and financial security). Overall the 2018/19 results show that people’s experiences remain poor. NHS Networks

        Changes to the friends and family test

        Changes to the friends and family test NHS England has overhauled the friends and family test, the standardised feedback tool used by NHS organisations. Patients will no longer be asked whether they would recommend the service but will be asked instead “Overall, how was your experience of our service?” and asked to select one of six responses. NHS Networks

        NHS extends staff retention scheme

        NHS extends staff retention scheme The NHS is extending a scheme that has helped keep more than 1,000 nurses, midwives and other clinicians in the NHS. A “transfer window” lets staff move within the NHS between areas while developing new skills. Rewards from local businesses like discount gym membership and targeted mentoring for new joiners are among the incentives used to keep them. NHS Networks

        Change or collapse: lessons from the drive to reform health and social care in Northern Ireland

        Change or collapse: lessons from the drive to reform health and social care in Northern Ireland  The health and social care system in Northern Ireland has seen seven fundamental reviews setting out major changes of direction in the last 20 years. Each has delivered a similar verdict: the country needs to reduce its reliance on hospitals, centralise some services for a critical mass at a smaller number of sites, and focus more on prevention and keeping people healthy. This report examines the factors that may be helping or hindering efforts to improve the health and social care system in Northern Ireland today. It aims to be of interest to health leaders across different countries, especially in the rest of the UK. The King's Fund
        Report

        Improving cyber security in the NHS

        Improving cyber security in the NHS This white paper from the Institute of Global Health Innovation finds that the NHS remains vulnerable to cyber-attack, and must take urgent steps to defend against threats which could risk the safety of patients. It outlines a number of key measures for NHS trusts to implement in order to increase cyber resilience. These initiatives include employing cyber security professionals in their IT teams, building ‘fire-breaks’ into their systems to allow certain segments to become isolated if infected with a computer virus, and having clear communication systems so staff know where to get help and advice on cyber security.
        White paper
        More detail

        Chief people officer: Prioritise NHS staff for mental healthcare

        Chief people officer: Prioritise NHS staff for mental healthcare  The NHS’ chief people officer has said NHS staff should be prioritised for receiving mental healthcare because of the “stressful” nature of the job. Prerana Issar, who started as chief people officer for NHS England and Improvement in April, proposed the idea during a Twitter chat earlier this week about how to make the NHS a great place to work. Health Service Journal

        Former health minister rejoins controversial drug maker's PR agency

        Former health minister rejoins controversial drug maker's PR agency  James O’Shaughnessy’s employer represents firm refusing to cut price of cystic fibrosis drug. Former health minister James O’Shaughnessy has rejoined the PR consultancy Portland, whose clients include a US drug company which is refusing to drop the price of an important cystic fibrosis drug to a level the NHS can afford.
        Lord O’Shaughnessy had dealings with the company, Vertex, while he was a health minister from 2016 until December last year. In April last year, he wrote a letter to the company, with fellow minister Steve Brine, asking it to negotiate a “responsible and proportionate” price for the drug Orkambi. The Guardian

        Government launches new training scheme to help teachers spot difference between pupil stress and mental health issues

        Government launches new training scheme to help teachers spot difference between pupil stress and mental health issues Teachers risk mistaking exam stress for mental health issues, as the Department for Education launches a new training scheme to help them spot the difference. One representative from every state school in the country will be offered a mental health training workshop as part of a £9.3 million Government scheme.
        Jaime Smith, director for mental health and wellbeing in schools at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children which will oversee the training, said that the pilot, which ran in 1,500 schools, showed that the training improved teachers' understanding about “what they can do to keep children in schools and support them in schools before referring onto specialist services, so only making that referral when it’s necessary”.
        Ms Smith added that teachers need to “understand the difference” between a clinical diagnosis when someone might suffering from something serious, to normal levels of stress. The DfE has already published new guidance on mental health and behaviour in schools, in which teachers are encouraged to refer children on to external specialists if they display symptoms of mental health issues. The Telegraph

        Record numbers struggle to see GP - and most can't see the one they want 

        Record numbers struggle to see GP - and most can't see the one they want  Most patients who want to see their own GP can no longer get an appointment with them, according to new figures suggesting the days of the family doctor are over.

        The statistics show record numbers of patients struggling to even get through on the telephone, and increasingly long waits for an appointment. For the first time, the majority of patients who wanted to see a particular doctor were unable to do so, the survey of more than 770,000 patients shows. The Telegraph

        Thursday, 11 July 2019

        Special delivery! Parents reunited with midwives after baby Adara born in Northampton General Hospital car park

        Special delivery! Parents reunited with midwives after baby Adara born in Northampton General Hospital car park At about 6am Shannon quickly called Northampton General Hospital who advised the couple to wait a little while longer but come 8.15am Shannon was close to giving birth. Northampton Chronicle and Echo

        NHS rolls out staff retention scheme as part of the Long Term Plan

        NHS rolls out staff retention scheme as part of the Long Term Plan A scheme that has helped keep more than a 1,000 nurses, midwives and other clinicians in the NHS will be rolled out to cover staff working in general practice as well as hospitals, the NHS announced today. A ‘transfer window’ lets staff move within the NHS between areas while developing new skills. Rewards from local businesses like discount gym membership and targeted mentoring for new joiners are among the incentives used to keep them. NHS England

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        Disability, mental health and wellbeing support in DHSC: workforce report 2019

        Disability, mental health and wellbeing support in DHSC: workforce report 2019 The Department of Health and Social Care's (DHSC) first annual workforce report on disability, mental health and wellbeing. The voluntary report sets out work the department is doing to support staff and promote good practice around disability, mental health and wellbeing. GOV.UK

        LGA charts growing impact of health and wellbeing boards

        LGA charts growing impact of health and wellbeing boards This report highlights how health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) are making a real difference through a wide range of initiatives, including reducing hospital admissions and time spent in hospital, reducing demand for GP appointments, helping thousands of smokers to quit, imposing restrictions on fast food outlets near schools, and reducing unemployment, poverty and poor housing. NHS Networks

        Daily drink of fruit juice can increase the risk of cancer by 12%, major study suggests

        Daily drink of fruit juice can increase the risk of cancer by 12%, major study suggests The findings, from a major study in France, come a week after Boris Johnson said he may reverse the sugar tax on drinks. Doctors said it should serve as a warning to the Government to take action. Mail Online

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        After days visiting my sick dad, I am in awe of the compassion of hospital staff | Adrian Chiles

        After days visiting my sick dad, I am in awe of the compassion of hospital staff | Adrian Chiles If I knew how to sculpt, I would carve statues to Redditch’s clinicians and cleaners

        I have been in hospital in Redditch all week. My dad has not been well and I am proving myself to be a loyal but not especially competent carer, lacking as I do patience, bravery and basic organisational skills. The Guardian

        Hackers 'could target anaesthetic devices'

        Hackers 'could target anaesthetic devices' A type of anaesthetic machine that has been used in NHS hospitals can be hacked and controlled from afar if left accessible on a hospital computer network, a cyber-security company says.

        A successful attacker would be able to change the amount of anaesthetic delivered to a patient, CyberMDX said. Alarms designed to alert anaesthetists to any danger could also be silenced. GE Healthcare, which makes the machines, said there was no "direct patient risk". BBC News

        Is an ounce of prevention worth a pound of cure? Estimates of the impact of English public health grant on mortality and morbidity

        Is an ounce of prevention worth a pound of cure? Estimates of the impact of English public health grant on mortality and morbidity Most previous attempts to estimate the marginal productivity of English health care expenditure have employed instruments that rely on statistical tests alone for their justification. A new approach to instrumentation has proposed the use of ‘funding rule’ variables as instruments, which can be justified on theoretical grounds. This paper exploits the availability of a funding formula for local authority (LA) public health expenditure in England to investigate the relationship between such expenditure and mortality. King's Fund Management and Policy Alert

        Wednesday, 10 July 2019

        Ellie's 18th birthday fundraiser wish comes true as 150 gifts for Northampton's poorly children flood in

        Ellie's 18th birthday fundraiser wish comes true as 150 gifts for Northampton's poorly children flood in
        A former Northampton hospital patient was inspired to set up a special birthday campaign to celebrate her 18th - and saw 150 presents donated to the children's ward.

        Ellie Waters published a tweet in March appealing for toys to be donated to the Northampton General Hospital Children's ward, as part of her 18th birthday wishlistNorthampton Chronicle and Echo

        Amazon Alexa offering NHS health advice

        Amazon Alexa offering NHS health advice People will be able to get expert health advice using Amazon Alexa devices, under a partnership with the NHS, the government has announced.

        From this week, the voice-assisted technology is automatically searching the NHS Choices website when UK users ask for health-related advice.

        The Department of Health in England said it could reduce demand on the NHS.

        Privacy campaigners have raised data protection concerns but Amazon say all information will be kept confidential. BBC News

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        CNO to enrol 14 trusts on global nursing excellence scheme

        CNO to enrol 14 trusts on global nursing excellence scheme The chief nursing officer for England has announced plans to put 14 NHS trusts through an internationally-recognised programme that aims to create a positive working environment for nursing staff.

        Dr Ruth May said she wanted trusts to take part in the Pathway to Excellence scheme to help create a culture where nursing and midwifery professionals at all levels were involved in the decision-making process, ensuring ”collective ownership” in developing and improving practice. Nursing Times

        NHS creating its own 'G-Cloud' for digital services

        NHS creating its own 'G-Cloud' for digital services The NHS is in the process of creating an organisation-wide procurement framework for IT services, similar to the G-Cloud digital marketplace set up for Central Government.

        NHS CIO Will Smart admitted that it's unusual for the NHS to make any organisation-wide purchases, but admitted that it is setting up a system to enable it to negotiate better deals with suppliers. www.computing.co.uk

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        How is the NHS performing? July 2019 quarterly monitoring report

        How is the NHS performing? July 2019 quarterly monitoring report Since April 2011, The King’s Fund has published a quarterly monitoring report (QMR) to track, analyse and comment on the issues the health and care system is facing. This is the 28th QMR, which takes stock of what has happened over the past few months with NHS financial and operational performance in England. King's Fund

        Vape shops open in two UK hospitals to help smokers kick the habit

        Vape shops open in two UK hospitals to help smokers kick the habit Vape shops have opened in two NHS hospitals in the West Midlands as part of efforts to eradicate smoking.

        The outlets run by Ecigwizard are at Sandwell general hospital in West Bromwich and Birmingham city hospital, both of which are run by Sandwell and West Birmingham hospitals NHS trust.

        The trust is clamping down on smoking on its grounds, with people being issued £50 fines since 5 July if they light up. Security cameras are also being used to police smoking. The Guardian

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        NHS fees: 'Couple couldn't take baby's body home'

        NHS fees: 'Couple couldn't take baby's body home' Charging overseas patients for NHS care in England must be suspended until it is clear it is not harming women, the Royal College of Midwives has said.

        A couple whose baby died following an emergency Caesarean were not given the body as they were unable to pay £10,000 in medical fees, one doctor has said.

        Joe Rylands said the expansion of charging had caused "disbelief" among many colleagues.

        The Department of Health said the charges had raised £1.3bn since 2015. BBC News

        Promoting professionalism, reforming regulation: government response to the consultation

        Promoting professionalism, reforming regulation: government response to the consultation Department of Health and Social Care -
        The original consultation set out proposals to make professional regulation faster, simpler and more responsive to the needs of patients, professionals, the public and employers. In this response, the government states it will take forward legislative changes to the regulators’ fitness to practise processes and operating framework. It believes these changes will deliver: modern and efficient fitness to practise processes; better supported professionals; and more responsive and accountable regulation. King's Fund

        Neuro patience: still waiting for improvements in treatment and care

        Neuro patience: still waiting for improvements in treatment and care Neuro Patience presents the findings of the 2018/19 National Neurology Patient Experience Survey. The report covers three main themes – accessible, personalised and holistic care and support (which includes social care, mental health and financial security). Overall the 2018/19 results show that people’s experiences remain poor. The Neurological Alliance

        Nurses will be offered supermarket discounts to persuade them to stay in the NHS  

        Nurses will be offered supermarket discounts to persuade them to stay in the NHS Nurses will be offered supermarket discounts and cheap gym membership as part of efforts to persuade workers stay in the NHS, health chiefs will say.

        Simon Stevens, head of the health service, will call for the wider rollout of schemes which have given staff savings of up to £1,000 a year on their shopping.

        The plans will see nurses, midwives and other clinical workers offered access to promotions and discounts, in a bid to encourage staff loyalty. The Telegraph

        Tuesday, 9 July 2019

        HPV vaccine could prevent over 100,000 cancers

        HPV vaccine could prevent over 100,000 cancers Estimates suggest that the HPV vaccine programme could prevent over 64,000 cervical cancers and nearly 50,000 non-cervical cancers by 2058.From September 2019, boys in school year 8 will be offered the free Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine for the first time. GOV.UK

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        New guidance calls on NHS to embed a learning and just culture to support staff, patients and carers

        New guidance calls on NHS to embed a learning and just culture to support staff, patients and carers Challenging the NHS’ workplace culture is key to improving patient safety says NHS Resolution in their latest guidance.

        Being fair: supporting a just and learning culture for staff and patients following incidents in the NHS highlights the need for the NHS to involve users of care services and staff in safety investigations.

        The paper draws on NHS Resolution’s unique dataset to explore best practice in response to incidents resulting from claims from across the system. NHS Resolution received 317 claims valued at close to £27.5 million in the past four years relating to staff stress and bullying in NHS trusts. NHS Resolution

        NHS Providers welcomes manageable workloads progress, but calls for NHS education investment - National Health Executive

        NHS Providers welcomes manageable workloads progress, but calls for NHS education investment - National Health Executive NHS Providers welcomes manageable workloads progress, but calls for NHS education investment.

        NHS Providers deputy chief executive Saffron Cordery has welcomed a report published by the General Medical Council on the results of their national training surveys which suggested progress towards more manageable workloads was happening, though still called for further investment into NHS education. National Health Executive

        'Amazing' gene-silencing drugs reach NHS

        'Amazing' gene-silencing drugs reach NHS A new form of medicine called "gene-silencing" has been approved for use by the NHS in England.

        The drugs will be used to reverse a disease called amyloidosis, which causes nerve and organ damage. It can be fatal. BBC News - Health

        Healthcare for people leaving an immigration removal centre: guidance for NHS providers

        Healthcare for people leaving an immigration removal centre: guidance for NHS providers Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) - This guidance is for NHS providers, including immigration removal centre (IRC) healthcare staff. It explains the entitlements and access to NHS care for people who are leaving an IRC and moving into the community. King's Fund Health Management and Policy Alert

        The role of the GP in caring for gender-questioning and transgender patients

        The role of the GP in caring for gender-questioning and transgender patients The RCGP has published an overview of the main issues facing gender-questioning and transgender patients, general practice and the broader health system. NHS Networks



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        Patients face long wait to see benefits from NHS funding boost

        Patients face long wait to see benefits from NHS funding boost New analysis from The King’s Fund suggests that patients face a long wait before they will see improvements in care as a result of the government’s £20 billion NHS funding boost. The King's Fund

        Monday, 8 July 2019

        Questions over decision to appoint part-time boss of struggling Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust - Leicestershire Live

        Questions over decision to appoint part-time boss of struggling Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust Health campaigners have questioned the decision to appoint a part-time chief executive to a failing Leicestershire health trust.

        Angela Hillery has been hired to replace retiring chief of Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, Dr Peter Miller, and faces the challenging task of overturning a recent CQC report which highlighted multiple failings within the trust.

        Ms Hillery will stay in post at Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust - a trust rated outstanding by the CQC - while carrying out the role.

        Health campaigners have questioned the move saying it is unrealistic to expect the required level of change while maintaining standards across the border in Northamptonshire. Leicestershire Live

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        UK plans £3m no-deal medicine transport

        UK plans £3m no-deal medicine transport The Department of Health and Social Care plans to spend £3m on no-deal Brexit measures to transport medication.

        It wants to hire an "express freight service" to transport medicines, blood and transplant tissue.

        But experts have warned that the deadline of 1 September set for the deal is a "tight" timeframe.

        The government's current plan is to leave the EU on 31 October, with or without a trade deal. BBC News

        NHS is out and proud for Pride

        NHS is out and proud for Pride Hundreds of thousands of NHS staff are set to join Pride celebrations across the country this weekend and throughout summer.

        Ahead of London Pride today (Saturday) the NHS has confirmed that more than 200 hospitals are launching dedicated schemes that support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT+) communities.

        As many as 150,000 doctors, nurses, cleaners, surgeons, midwives and other health service staff are taking up a new Rainbow Badge initiative which gives staff the opportunity to show their support for LGBT+ patients and staff. NHS England

        NHS operations cancelled in standoff with consultants

        NHS operations cancelled in standoff with consultants Hospitals are having to cancel operations and cancer scans are going unread for weeks because consultant doctors have suddenly begun working to rule in a standoff over NHS pensions.

        Doctors say the dispute is escalating so quickly that it will send NHS services “into meltdown” and is so serious that it poses “an existential threat” to the health service’s survival. The Guardian

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        NHS should ban bell-ringing ceremonies celebrating end of cancer treatment, charity says

        NHS should ban bell-ringing ceremonies celebrating end of cancer treatment, charity says
        The NHS should scrap bell-ringing ceremonies celebrating the end of cancer treatment, because it is a "kick in the teeth" for those still suffering, a patient battling the disease has said.

        The bell-ringing ritual at the end of chemotherapy or radiation has become common in hospitals and clinics nationwide in recent years.

        Friends and family and staff clap and cheer as the patient reads out a poem before ringing a bell to show they have "beaten" the disease.

        The ceremonies, often proudly shared by patients in online videos, originated in the US and now feature at around 200 UK hospitals.

        But critics are complaining that the bells are a "divisive and cruel" reminder for incurable patients on wards that they will never get to ring one. The Telegraph

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        Commissioning standard for urgent dental care

        Commissioning standard for urgent dental care NHS England has published a standard to support the commissioning of consistent patient-centred urgent dental care services that are aligned with other urgent care services. NHS Networks

        Game Of Thrones star Emilia Clarke backs new NHS stroke plan

        Game Of Thrones star Emilia Clarke backs new NHS stroke plan Game Of Thrones star Emilia Clarke, who suffered a devastating stroke eight years ago, is backing an NHS drive to improve stroke care for young people.

        Clarke, who is an ambassador for the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), is supporting a programme to train more nurses to become specialists in neuro rehabilitation.

        The plan will improve stroke care for those aged 18 to 40, both in the private sector and the NHS. ITV News

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        Right-touch assurance assessment for sonographers

        Right-touch assurance assessment for sonographers The Professional Standards Authority (PSA) has published a report considering the most appropriate form of assurance for the role of sonographer, based on an assessment to the risk of harm arising to patients from the practice.

        The PSA have concluded that, as most sonographers are qualified nurses and radiographers and are therefore statutorily registered by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), statutory regulation for this profession is not currently recommended. Although, this could change if the number of people joining the profession through an undergraduate route significantly increases. NHS Employers

        Air pollution could shorten a child's life by up to seven months

        Air pollution could shorten a child's life by up to seven months  Air pollution could shorten a child's life by up to seven months says the first study conducted since new Government guidelines.

        An eight-year-old child born in 2011 may die between two to seven months early if exposed over their lifetime to projected future pollution concentrations, King's College London researchers studying the city of Birmingham have found. It is the first time new Government guidance on "mortality burdens" of air pollution, which was published last August has been applied in practice in a large city area. The Telegraph

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        Friday, 5 July 2019

        Peers call for NHS-style free social care system and an extra £8bn to tackle funding crisis

        Peers call for NHS-style free social care system and an extra £8bn to tackle funding crisis  Peers call for NHS-style free social care system and an extra £8bn to tackle funding crisis. The House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee has challenged the two Tory leadership candidates to create an NHS-style free service in response to rapidly rising demand in social care.

        Peers including former Conservative and Labour chancellors have called for an immediate £8bn investment in social care, to tackle the “national scandal” which left 1.4 million older people with unmet care needs last year.
        The report suggests introducing free personal care in an NHS-style format which, despite likely proving more expensive than alternatives, will reduce demand for residential care and health care and encourage people to seek home care earlier. National Health Executive

        New charter launched to help trusts deal with safety incidents

        New charter launched to help trusts deal with safety incidents NHS staff are requiring “significant” amounts of support after being involved in patient safety incidents, prompting a national body to draw up a new charter for how trusts should respond.
        The “Being Fair” charter has been created by NHS Resolution (formerly the NHS Litigation Authority) in a bid to ensure trusts respond to incidents in a way that is fair to both the patient and staff involved, and that errors are not repeated. Health Service Journal

        How private hospitals use financial incentives to lure doctors

        How private hospitals use financial incentives to lure doctors This report looks into how the private hospital sector uses financial incentives to attract NHS consultants to work for them. NHS Networks

        1.8m fewer adult smokers in England in 2018

        1.8m fewer adult smokers in England in 2018 The number of adult cigarette smokers in England has dropped by around 1.8m from 7.7m (19.8%) in 20113 to 5.9m (14.4%) in 2018, new official figures show.
        The prevalence of adult smokers throughout the UK was 14.7%. Of the constituent countries, England had the lowest (14.4%). Prevalence was highest in Scotland (16.3%), followed by Wales (15.9%) and then Northern Ireland (15.5%) NHS Digital

        What a difference a place makes: the growing impact of health and wellbeing boards

        What a difference a place makes: the growing impact of health and wellbeing boards This report highlights how health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) are making a real difference through a wide range of initiatives, including reducing hospital admissions and time spent in hospital, reducing demand for GP appointments, helping thousands of smokers to quit, imposing restrictions on fast food outlets near schools, and reducing unemployment, poverty and poor housing. King's Fund
        Report

        Social care funding: time to end a national scandal

        Social care funding: time to end a national scandal This report finds that publicly funded social care support is shrinking, as diminishing budgets have forced local authorities to limit the numbers of people who receive public funding. It recommends that the Government immediately spends £8 billion to restore social care to acceptable standards and then introduces free personal care over a period of five years. King's Fund
        Report
        Economic Affairs Committee - news

        There is an alternative: ending austerity in the UK

        There is an alternative: ending austerity in the UK The global financial crisis of 2007/08 had a significant impact on the UK’s public finances. Since 2010/11, successive UK governments have chosen to impose a programme of austerity in an attempt to reduce the budget deficit. However, there is a growing consensus that austerity has failed economically, fiscally and socially. This report argues that the state must have a bigger role – and must invest more – in four ‘social deficits’, including health inequalities and mental health. King's Fund
        Report
        Institute for Public Policy Research - publications

        Majority of hospitals using NICE endorsed sepsis tools, finds report

        Majority of hospitals using NICE endorsed sepsis tools, finds report The vast majority of NHS hospitals in England are using officially endorsed clinical tools designed to improve the response to life-threatening sepsis, new research has found.
        However, MPs and campaigners say more still needs to be done to raise awareness of the “hugely under-acknowledged” condition among healthcare professionals and the public in order to boost survival rates. Nursing Times

        “Worryingly high” number of people infected with latent form of drug resistant TB 

        “Worryingly high” number of people infected with latent form of drug resistant TB  More than 19 million people around the globe are infected with one of the most complex forms of dormant tuberculosis, threatening efforts to control the fatal disease, researchers have warned.

        In the first study to estimate the number of people living with latent multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), published in Lancet Infectious Diseases, experts found that three people in every 1,000 carry the hard-to-treat bacteria – a “worryingly high” figure that “threatens elimination goals”. The Telegraph

        Thursday, 4 July 2019

        Dedication and 'infectious enthusiasm' earn Northampton nurses national recognition

        Dedication and 'infectious enthusiasm' earn Northampton nurses national recognition Two nurses from Northampton General Hospital have earned on the highest healthcare awards available for going above and beyond the expectations of their role.

        Holly Slyne and Gillian Smith are among some of the first nurses nationally to receive the Chief Nursing Officer silver award.

        The award and two bespoke badges were presented to them during a visit to the hospital in June from Susan Aitkenhead, deputy Chief Nursing Officer. Northampton Chronicle & Echo

        Health campaigners question whether Northamptonshire health trust boss can take on a second job

        Health campaigners question whether Northamptonshire health trust boss can take on a second job Health campaigners have questioned the decision to appoint a part-time chief executive to a failing Leicestershire health trust.

        Angela Hillery has been hired to replace retiring chief of Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, Dr Peter Miller, and faces the challenging task of overturning a recent CQC report which highlighted multiple failings within the trust.

        But Ms Hillery will stay in post at Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust - a trust rated outstanding by the CQC - while carrying out the role.Northampton Chronicle & Echo

        Stronger evidence needed to improve confidence in medicinal cannabis

        Stronger evidence needed to improve confidence in medicinal cannabis Despite the rescheduling of medicinal cannabis, very few prescriptions have been issued. One of the many reasons for this is because of the gaps in the evidence base.

        Most forms of medicinal cannabis are unlicensed and do not have NICE approval, says the Health and Social Care Committee report on Drugs policy: medicinal cannabis. Commons Select Committee: Parliament UK

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        Physical activity helps children to deal with life’s challenges

        Physical activity helps children to deal with life’s challenges  Public Health England, Disney UK and Sport England launch new Change4Life campaign to inspire children to get more active. A new survey from Change4Life and Disney UK has found that less than half of parents are aware that physical activity can build children’s self-confidence (49%), reduce anxiety (47%) and improve their self-esteem (46%). Just 16% (1 in 6) think that physical activity can help children develop attributes which make it easier to cope with life’s little set-backs. GOV.UK

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        Alcohol abuse affects one in five UK inpatients, study suggests

        Alcohol abuse affects one in five UK inpatients, study suggests One in five people admitted to a UK hospital drinks alcohol in a harmful way and one in 10 depends on it, a study suggests.

        King's College London researchers want people with issues caused by drinking to be screened. They are also calling for more trained staff to give support.

        Alcohol can cause a large number of medical conditions, which costs the NHS in the UK around £3.5bn a year. BBC News - Health

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        Health of older people suffering in poor housing, MPs warn

        Health of older people suffering in poor housing, MPs warn More than 2 million older people are suffering physical and mental ill health and even death as a consequence of living in substandard and non-accessible homes, according to a cross-party group of MPs.

        Substandard housing costs the NHS £1.4bn every year with cold, damp and other hazards causing falls and exacerbating conditions such as heart disease, strokes, respiratory illnesses and arthritis as well as contributing to poor mental health, according to an in-depth inquiry by the all-party parliamentary group for ageing and older people. The Guardian

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        Making the right choices: using data-driven technology to transform mental healthcare

        Making the right choices: using data-driven technology to transform mental healthcare This report examines the current landscape of data-driven technologies and their applications in mental health care, highlighting areas where these tools offer the most potential for the NHS and its patients. It discusses what makes mental health different from other areas of health, and the implications this has for the application of data-driven tools. It also examines barriers to implementation, and proposes ways to move forward. King's Fund - Health Management and Policy Alert

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