Monday, 23 September 2019

Inside England’s first accident and emergency department for older people

Inside England’s first accident and emergency department for older people  Like most places, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital’s A&E department is under pressure from rising demand. And performance against the four-hour A&E waiting time standard remains far below the national target.

Some of this pressure – particularly at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital – can be explained by older patients accounting for a growing share of A&E attendances. These patients often require more complex and specialist care to avoid admission to hospital, which can take time to arrange, meaning older patients wait longer in A&E or end up being admitted to hospital unnecessarily.
But this is where Norfolk and Norwich’s journey diverges from most other trusts, because instead of trying to constantly pull geriatric specialists down to A&E, they built an older person’s emergency
department (OPED). King's Fund
 

Detailed guide: How healthcare providers can prepare for Brexit

Detailed guide: How healthcare providers can prepare for Brexit  This guidance sets out the actions that healthcare providers should take before and after Brexit. Doing this will help to plan for and
manage potential service disruption to healthcare in case the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
This guidance is for commissioners and healthcare providers, including hospitals, care homes, GP practices and community pharmacies.  It is based on the advice contained in the Brexit operational
readiness guidance issued for healthcare providers in December 2018. Department of Health

Homing in on free personal care

Homing in on free personal care  This report from Independent Age outlines the various reasons why free personal care can
help provide the systemic change that social care is in need of. The
report shows the scale of how many older people have had to sell their
homes to pay for care as well as how the current deferred payments
system is not working.  King's Fund

Course Corrections: How Health Care Innovators Learn from Setbacks to Achieve Success

Course Corrections: How Health Care Innovators Learn from Setbacks to Achieve Success Setbacks and outright failures are inherent to innovation and provide an
opportunity for health care leaders to learn as they design new care
models that improve health outcomes while reducing costs and unnecessary
service use.

When designing new care models, leaders should strive to understand
which patients fail to benefit and consider changing staff to better
meet patients’ needs. They should seek to identify which elements of
their models are most essential and find common ground with health care
payers on how to measure and reward success. The Commonwealth Fund

New Report on Health Care Affordability in Europe

New Report on Health Care Affordability in Europe  A recent World Health Organization (WHO) Europe report examining
financial hardship and unmet need for health services in 24 high- and
middle-income European countries found that catastrophic health care
spending is heavily concentrated among the poorest populations, with the
majority of spending on outpatient drugs. Those countries with strong
financial protections in place and low levels of unmet need were found
to have the following features in common: universal coverage based on
population entitlement; minimized out-of-pocket payments, particularly
for poor people and regular users of health services; caps on
out-of-pocket spending set at no more than 15 percent of total health
spending; and adequate public health spending to ensure timely access to
care. The Commonwealth Fund

Government sugar crackdown branded a 'shambles' as it emerges sweets got sweeter during campaign

Government sugar crackdown branded a 'shambles' as it emerges sweets got sweeter during campaign  Puddings and confectionary became sweeter during a government sugar crackdown, a new report has shown, as obesity campaigners branded the outcome a ‘shambles.’ Britons are collectively eating 2.6 per cent more sugar than they did before 2015, when Public Health England (PHE) told food manufacturers to voluntarily cut the amount in products by 20 per cent by 2020. The Telegraph

See also:
  • Efforts to cut sugar out of food way off target BBC News

Labour pledges free personal care for over-65s in England

Labour pledges free personal care for over-65s in England  Labour is promising free personal
care in England for over-65s most in need of it, so they will not have to pay for help with dressing, washing and meals.  At the moment, those with savings of more than £14,250 have to contribute to the cost of home or residential help.
Labour says the pledge, costing an estimated £6bn a year, will double the number of those not having to pay.  It would bring England into line with Scotland, where personal care is free for those with the most severe needs.  BBC News

Health cover for retired Britons in EU to last six months in no-deal Brexit

Health cover for retired Britons in EU to last six months in no-deal Brexit  The government has pledged £150m to temporarily cover the healthcare
costs of 180,000 British nationals living in the EU in the event of a
no-deal Brexit. The health secretary, Matt Hancock, said workers posted to the bloc,
plus pensioners and students, who can currently have their healthcare
funded by the UK under existing reciprocal arrangements, would continue
to be covered for six months after a crash out. The Guardian

NHS bed shortages cause late cancellation of cancer surgeries

NHS bed shortages cause late cancellation of cancer surgeries  One of the NHS’s biggest hospital trusts has apologised to a
78-year-old man after it had to cancel his cancer surgery twice in a
month because of a lack of beds. On both occasions the patient, who has
liver cancer, waited in the hospital for six hours and was ready to go
into the operating theatre to have his tumour removed when he was sent
home. Staff at Leicester general hospital explained to him that there was
no high-dependency bed for him if he experienced complications during
the surgery.  The Guardian

Alexa's robotic voice leaving dementia patients 'deeply distressed', social care report finds

Alexa's robotic voice leaving dementia patients 'deeply distressed', social care report finds  Amazon Alexa's robotic voice is causing "deep distress" for dementia patients by telling them to take their medicine, a new report has warned.  The technology think tank, Doteveryone, said older social care patients were often left confused by new gadgets and fearful they would replace contact with human carers.

It also found that disabled people feared that incoming advances with smart homes, which have features such as self-opening doors and windows, could malfunction and leave them trapped. The report, Better Care in the Age of Automation, argued that technology had a vital role in improving the care system but should not lead to “naive enthusiasm” that gadgets can replace human carers. The Telegraph

Friday, 20 September 2019

What can England learn from the long-term care system in Germany?

What can England learn from the long-term care system in Germany? This report seeks to assess the German long-term care system through the lens of the policy challenges that face England. Using a literature review and a series of interviews with experts on the German system both within and outside Germany, it seeks to draw out elements of the German system that could either be incorporated into the current system or that offer cautionary tales. Nuffield Trust

Social media sites act on NHS call for greater online protection

Social media sites act on NHS call for greater online protection The chief executive of the NHS in England has called on all social media firm to crack down on potentially harmful material after two of the biggest sites confirm they plan to act on health service demands for action. NHS England

Caring, supportive, collaborative: doctors’ vision for change in the NHS

Caring, supportive, collaborative: doctors’ vision for change in the NHS This report draws on the experience and expertise of BMA members across all branches of medical practice in the UK. It outlines where the BMA believe changes are needed to ensure patient care is safe, makes the NHS a great place to work and transforms services for the better. British Medical Association

Hospitals relying on 'emergency' loans to cover costs

Hospitals relying on 'emergency' loans to cover costs Hospitals in England are "lurching" from month to month on "emergency" government loans to cover costs, a think tank has said.

The Nuffield Trust said some NHS hospitals had to cut spending on patients to pay the interest.

Trusts owed £10bn to the government in 2018-19 for "interim revenue support" and paid £185m in interest last year. BBC News

Children being denied new cancer drugs

Children being denied new cancer drugs Children with cancer are being denied new, highly precise drugs that are available to adults, doctors warn.

Medics at the Royal Marsden Hospital and the Institute of Cancer Research said the rules were "too cautious".

Their study, in the European Journal of Cancer, found just 7% of suitable children were getting drugs that target genetic weak spots in their cancer.

The researchers said children may benefit from precision medicines even more than adults. BBC News

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Diabetes drug also treats heart failure, researchers say

Diabetes drug also treats heart failure, researchers say A drug used successfully to treat type 2 diabetes can also be effective to treat heart failure, researchers at Glasgow University have said.

They described the clinical implications of their findings as "potentially huge."

The drug Dapagliflozin controls blood sugar levels, helps promote weight loss and reduces blood pressure. BBC News

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NHS trusts give Google green light to process confidential patient data

NHS trusts give Google green light to process confidential patient data Sensitive NHS patient records will be shared with Google after an unprecedented deal signed by five healthcare trusts.

Confidential data now to fall under the US tech giant’s watch, covering thousands of NHS patients, could include medical history, diagnoses, treatment dates and ethnic origin.

It is the first agreement of its kind in the medical sector, coming after DeepMind, a London-based artificial intelligence firm, handed control of its healthcare contracts to its Californian parent company Google Health UK. iNews

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Most common antidepressant does little to relieve depression symptoms, researchers say

Most common antidepressant does little to relieve depression symptoms, researchers say The most common antidepressant does little to relieve symptoms of depression, researchers say.

The largest study of its kind found that most people taking sertraline saw little or no effect on depressive symptoms, such as low mood, in the first six to 12 weeks of taking the drug.

Experts said they were “surprised” by the findings relating to depression, but that it was clear the drugs helped cut anxiety and should continue to be prescribed by GPs. The Independent

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Asylum seeker denied cancer treatment by Home Office dies

Asylum seeker denied cancer treatment by Home Office dies Kelemua Mulat had advanced breast cancer but was refused NHS care for six weeks.

An Ethiopian woman who was denied potentially life-saving cancer treatment for six weeks amid confusion about whether she should be charged by the NHS has died aged 39.

Kelemua Mulat, who had advanced breast cancer, was refused chemotherapy last year after Home Office and NHS officials decided that she was not eligible for free care. The Guardian

Class A drug use hits record high as milennial ecstasy and cocaine habits blamed

Class A drug use hits record high as milennial ecstasy and cocaine habits blamed Record numbers of people are taking Class A drugs, figures have shown as experts blamed the cocaine and ecstasy habits of millennials for the rise.

The Home Office said 3.7% of 16 to 59-year-olds admitted taking the most dangerous substances in 2018/19 - the highest rate since records began in 1996. The Daily Telegraph

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Twice as many primary school children are hospitalised for rotten teeth as for tonsillitis

Twice as many primary school children are hospitalised for rotten teeth as for tonsillitis Tooth decay now lands children in hospital more than twice as often as tonsillitis.

NHS figures revealed today there were 25,702 hospital admissions for tooth decay among five to nine-year-olds in England in 2018-19.

In comparison, only 11,811 admissions were needed to treat tonsillitis – the second most common problem on the list. The Daily Mail

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Thursday, 19 September 2019

Northamptonshire elderly and homeless charities lose funding worth more than £1.5m

Northamptonshire elderly and homeless charities lose funding worth more than £1.5m More than £1.5m is being taken away from a dozen Northamptonshire charities which provide vital services to the over-65s, the vulnerable and the homeless.

Established organisations such as the Autumn Centre in Corby, Marlow House in Desborough and the Dostiyo Asian Women’s and Girls Association in Northampton have all been told that the funding given to them by Northamptonshire County Council as part of its £1.6m social wellbeing contract will come to an end in March. Northamptonshire Telegraph

Rats found at Northampton General Hospital four times, FOI reveals

Rats found at Northampton General Hospital four times, FOI reveals Over five years pest control experts have been called to Northampton General Hospital 127 times - and four of those times were for incidents involving rats.

An freedom of information request submitted to Northampton General Hospital (NGH) has revealed that the hospital has faced 127 incidents of pests on their premises in the past five years. Northampton Chronicle and Echo

The strange politics of social care funding reform

The strange politics of social care funding reform When the current Prime Minister first stood on the steps of Downing Street, he promised to fix social care once and for all. Only a few weeks later, these plans have been relegated to being published ‘in due course’. At a recent breakfast event we hosted here at The King’s Fund, the phrase ‘in due course’ was greeted with laughter in the room. For those of us interested in social care funding reform, we have been waiting since 2017 for ‘in due course’ to have its moment by way of a promised Green Paper. Many of us have waited for 20 years for meaningful reform and are still waiting.

Fastest drop in smoking rates in over a decade as Stoptober launches

Fastest drop in smoking rates in over a decade as Stoptober launches The latest data from a national smoking study indicates adult smoking rates fell 2.2% from January to July 2019 - equivalent to 200 fewer smokers every hour. Public Health England

Policy briefing: social care funding and mental health

Policy briefing: social care funding and mental health This briefing explores what a fair and sustainable funding settlement for social care needs to look like in order to deliver parity of esteem for mental health and sufficient funding to support people of working age as well as those in later life. It reviews the current funding and provision of mental health social work for people of working age in England. It finds that mental health social work has a vital role in helping people to live independently and to secure their rights and dignity. Centre for Mental Health

Health care's climate footprint: how the health sector contributes to the global climate crisis and opportunities for action

Health care's climate footprint: how the health sector contributes to the global climate crisis and opportunities for action According to this report, if the global health care sector were a country it would be the fifth-largest greenhouse gas emitter on the planet. The report finds health care’s footprint is equivalent to 4.4 per cent of global net emissions and that fossil fuel combustion makes up well over half of health care’s global climate footprint. The report makes the case for a transformation of the health care sector that aligns it with the Paris Agreement goal of limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees celsius. Health Care Without Harm

    Finding good care home 'impossible' in some areas

    Finding good care home 'impossible' in some areas High concentrations of substandard care homes in some areas leave families with no choice but to accept an under-performing home for older and disabled relatives, an analysis suggests.

    Over a third of beds were in settings rated as not good enough in a sixth of areas, the think tank IPPR found. BBC News

    Boris Johnson confronted on east London hospital visit

    Boris Johnson confronted on east London hospital visit The prime minister was visiting a children's ward at Whipps Cross Hospital when he was approached by a father.

    The man, who is also a Labour activist, told Boris Johnson that the ward was understaffed and the NHS was being destroyed.

    A spokesman for the prime minister later said Mr Johnson was visiting public services to see for himself the reality of the situation. BBC News

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    84% of care home beds in England owned by private firms

    84% of care home beds in England owned by private firms For-profit companies own 381,524 of England’s care home beds, thinktank finds

    More than eight out of 10 care home beds are provided by profit-driven companies, including more than 50,000 by large operators owned by private equity firms, research reveals.

    Private companies now own and run 84% of beds in care homes in England used by older people, as local councils have almost totally withdrawn from a key area of social care they used to dominate. The Guardian

    Rogue online pharmacies face bans for selling powerful painkillers without meeting patients

    Rogue online pharmacies face bans for selling powerful painkillers without meeting patients Online pharmacies face losing their licences if they don't stop selling dangerous drugs without carrying out patient background checks, a regulator has warned.

    The General Pharmaceutical Council (GPC) today said it was taking 'robust action' against rogue pharmacies liberally selling prescription drugs online.

    Some have been accused of selling addictive drugs such as opioid painkillers like tramadol and morphine after only asking patients to fill out online questionnaires. The Daily Mail

    A quarter of NHS beds 'could be taken up by diabetic patients by 2030'

    A quarter of NHS beds 'could be taken up by diabetic patients by 2030' More than a quarter of NHS hospital beds could be taken up by diabetic patients by 2030, according to forecasts.

    A report by Diabetes UK last year estimated that one in four inpatients would have type 1 or type 2 diabetes as well as their main illness.

    But there are concerns the figure is too conservative as the number of people developing the condition because they're obese continues to rise. The Daily Mail

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    Wednesday, 18 September 2019

    Mental Healthcare in Young People and Young Adults

    Mental Healthcare in Young People and Young Adults This review looks in detail at the mental healthcare provided to young people from the unique perspective of the overlap between physical and mental healthcare, the quality of physical and mental healthcare provided and how patients with mental health conditions use healthcare services. The overarching aim of this study was to identify areas of care that can be improved for all patients aged between 11 and 25 years.Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

    Regulation survey 2019

    Regulation survey 2019 Less than half of NHS trusts (39%) think NHS England, NHS Improvement and the Care Quality Commission are doing a good job of regulation, according to a survey by NHS Providers.

    The survey highlights the growing tension between the current system of regulation, which focuses on organisations, and the ambition to move towards an approach that takes system working into account.

    The good life: measuring inclusive growth across communities

    The good life: measuring inclusive growth across communities This report produced jointly with the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Inclusive Growth, introduces the new CPP Inclusive Growth Community Index. This combines data on five key outcomes – consumption, healthy life expectancy, leisure, inequality and unemployment – to create an inclusive growth score (IG score) applicable to local and combined authorities up and down the UK. Centre for Progressive Policy

      Can you turn around the health of an entire town?

      Can you turn around the health of an entire town? How do you improve the health of an entire town? That was the question facing the former fishing port of Fleetwood, in Lancashire.

      It's a place where lives have been blighted by illness and people were dying younger.

      So, in 2016, a local GP began to lead efforts to turn things around, helping people take control of their health.

      Since then, there have been ups and downs with the progress of what's known as the Healthier Fleetwood initiative. BBC News

      Inquiry into safety and wellbeing concerns at two hospitals

      Inquiry into safety and wellbeing concerns at two hospitals A public inquiry will be held to examine safety and wellbeing issues at the new children's hospital in Edinburgh and the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow.

      The inquiry will determine how vital issues relating to ventilation and other key building systems occurred.

      It will also look at how to avoid mistakes in future projects. BBC News

      Conflicts, climate change and mental illness among ‘biggest emerging threats to children', United Nations warns

      Conflicts, climate change and mental illness among ‘biggest emerging threats to children', United Nations warns Conflicts, the worsening climate crisis, a decline in mental health and online misinformation are among the biggest emerging global threats to children, the United Nations Children's Fund (Unicef) has warned.

      Global leaders must step up their efforts to address growing challenges facing the younger generation, the charity said. The Independent

      See also:

      How hospitals can help nurse the planet back to health

      How hospitals can help nurse the planet back to health | Anna Bawden Switching anaesthetic gases, using electric ambulances and ’greening’ dialysis are reducing the NHS’s carbon footprint

      On Friday, thousands of adults across the world will take part in the global climate strike to show solidarity with Greta Thunberg and the young students who have been walking out of school for months to raise awareness of the climate emergency. Among them will be many public sector workers, including some NHS staff. The Guardian

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      NHS fraud costs more than £1.2 billion a year, report reveals

      NHS fraud costs more than £1.2 billion a year, report reveals The NHS is losing more than £1.2 billion to fraud each year, according to a new report which found that GPs are inventing patients in order to make extra money.

      “List inflation”, where practices claim they are treating more patients than they are, fraud through self-prescribing and the filing of duplicate timesheets by agency staff are among a range of “sharp practices” investigators have uncovered. The Daily Telegraph

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      Outbreak of a flu-like illness 'could circulate the world in 36 hours and kill 80 million people'

      Outbreak of a flu-like illness 'could circulate the world in 36 hours and kill 80 million people' A century ago the Spanish flu pandemic infected a third of the world's population and killed 50 million people.

      If a similar outbreak were to happen with today's constantly-travelling population, the effects could be even worse, a report has suggested.

      The Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB), a team of health experts led by a former chief of the World Health Organization, has produced the report to try and spur world leaders into action. The Daily Mail

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      Number of young adults with type 2 diabetes is on the rise

      Number of young adults with type 2 diabetes is on the rise Record numbers of young adults are being diagnosed with diabetes because of the obesity epidemic.

      One in eight new cases is now in the 18-40 age group, a major study revealed last night.

      It found that these patients were significantly more likely to be overweight than those who only develop type 2 diabetes in later life. The Daily Mail

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      Tuesday, 17 September 2019

      Kettering hospital's baby screening service given 22 recommendations for improvement

      Kettering hospital's baby screening service given 22 recommendations for improvement Assessors have given Kettering General Hospital's antenatal and newborn screening department a list of key recommendations to help improve services.

      Public Health England quality assurance inspectors assessed the Rothwell Road hospital for the first time in five years to check to standard of screening programmes that forewarn parents if there could be something wrong with their baby.

      The hospital was found to be meeting targets but was told to improve in several areas. Northamptonshire Telegraph

      New targets mustn’t distract from the fact that NHS performance this year has seen a sharp decline

      New targets mustn’t distract from the fact that NHS performance this year has seen a sharp decline Responding to the latest NHS performance figures, Professor John Appleby, Chief Economist at the Nuffield Trust said:

      "These figures confirm that this year has seen an alarming slump in NHS performance against important targets. This summer was no exception, showing little sign of reprieve for staff and patients, with 6% more people turning up at A&E in August compared to last year. Over the last 6 months there has been on average over 60,000 more people waiting more than 4 hours in A&E per month compared to last year."

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      A&E attendances twice as high for people in the most deprived areas

      A&E attendances twice as high for people in the most deprived areas There were more than twice as many attendances to Accident and Emergency departments in England for the 10% of the population living in the most deprived areas (3.1 million), compared with the least deprived 10% (1.5 million) in 2018-19, according to official figures released today.

      NHS Digital’s Hospital Accident and Emergency Activity 2018/19, created in partnership with NHS England and NHS Improvement, also shows that attendances for the 20% of the population living in the most deprived areas accounted for 27% of all A&E attendances (5.9 million attendances).

      Patient safety and the importance of a just culture

      Patient safety and the importance of a just culture The first annual World Patient Safety Day urges people to show their commitment to making healthcare safer. For over 130 years the MDU has helped doctors when things go wrong when treating patients. We have had the opportunity to see first-hand what works well in promoting safer patient care and what does not.

      In our contribution to World Patient Safety Day we look at the fundamental importance of getting organisational culture right - moving the focus from blaming an individual to working out why that person, within the system, was not able to deliver the safest care possible. MDU

      Nurse numbers rise 'eclipsed by jump in patients'

      Nurse numbers rise 'eclipsed by jump in patients' The rise in hospital nurses in England has been dwarfed by a jump in patients, a study suggests.

      The Royal College of Nursing research points to data showing the nurse workforce has increased by 4.6% in five years.

      But hospital admissions have jumped by 12.3% - nearly three times the rate.

      The union says this shows more needs to be done to ensure safe staffing, but the government says the rising NHS budget will ensure high-quality care. BBC News

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      PCNs who achieve targets 'further' and 'faster' to receive extra funding

      PCNs who achieve targets 'further' and 'faster' to receive extra funding NHS England has unveiled new financial incentives for primary care networks (PCNs) who meet certain targets ahead of others.

      In a letter sent last week to stakeholders, NHS England revealed that networks who will complete the national service requirements 'further' and 'faster' will be offered additional funding. Pulse

      Prostate drug may slow Parkinson's disease

      Prostate drug may slow Parkinson's disease A drug used to treat enlarged prostates may be a powerful medicine against Parkinson's disease, according to an international team of scientists.

      Terazosin helps ease benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by relaxing the muscles of the bladder and prostate.

      But researchers believe it has another beneficial action, on brain cells damaged by Parkinson's.

      They say the drug might slow Parkinson's progression - something that is not possible currently. BBC News

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      NHS errors: Tools left in patients and amputation errors make list of blunders

      NHS errors: Tools left in patients and amputation errors make list of blunders More than 600 patients have suffered due to serious NHS errors, including botched hysterectomies and surgeons operating on the wrong patient.

      A total of 629 "never events" - meaning they are so serious they should never happen - occurred between April 2018 and July 2019 in NHS hospitals - the equivalent of nine patients every week. Sky News

      Britons keep quiet about pain to avoid annoying others, survey claims

      Britons keep quiet about pain to avoid annoying others, survey claims Millions of people in the UK do not speak up when they are in pain because they do not want to annoy others, a new poll claims.

      A survey of 2,000 adults by Nurofen found participants experience two headaches a week on average, with one in five admitting this has led to emotional distress.

      And one fifth have taken time off work due to back pain. The Independent

      Mothers to be told they can harvest breast milk and store it in NHS hospital for first time

      Mothers to be told they can harvest breast milk and store it in NHS hospital for first time Expectant mothers are being given breast milk harvesting packs and encouraged to store their milk in NHS hospital freezers for the first time.

      The packs, which include a syringe to store the extracted colostrum - the first breast milk produced during pregnancy - are being provided by East Kent Hospitals University Foundation Trust. The Daily Telegraph

      Monday, 16 September 2019

      International recruitment scheme attracts 12 GPs to one area in six months

      International recruitment scheme attracts 12 GPs to one area in six months The international GP recruitment programme has brought 12 GPs to Northamptonshire in just six months since starting the scheme.

      Since the programme was initiated in Nene in March, seven international GPs have been recruited to start their post in general practice ‘imminently’.

      The CCG confirmed that a further three are to start in the area around November or December, and another two will begin work in February 2020. NHS Nene CCG also confirmed that all 12 GPs are from the EU. Pulse

      NHS admin: how does it affect patient experience?

      NHS admin: how does it affect patient experience? Are all your interactions with NHS services as good as you would like? My guess is that, at one time or another, most of us have experienced feeling frustrated by bureaucratic processes, outdated IT systems or unsatisfactory interactions with administrative staff. The King's Fund

      WHO publishes international comparison of nursing workforce

      WHO publishes international comparison of nursing workforce A report from the World Health Organisation explores the variations in structure and organisation of the nursing workforce across the different countries of Europe.

      As health systems shift radically in response to rising demand, the role of nurses becomes even more important. The report is part of a two-volume study on the contributions that nurses make to strengthening health systems. Its aim is to raise the profile of nursing within health policy.

      Course corrections: how health care innovators learn from setbacks to achieve success

      Course corrections: how health care innovators learn from setbacks to achieve success This report examines new models for delivering and paying for health care to better serve vulnerable patients, including people with multiple chronic conditions, serious illnesses, or functional limitations, as well as those at risk of developing health problems because of their social circumstances or behavioral health conditions. It also showcases models that improve quality of care and health outcomes while lowering costs or reducing unnecessary health care use. The Commonwealth Fund

        Bodies of Evidence: How professional organisations in health, education and policing champion the use of research

        Bodies of Evidence: How professional organisations in health, education and policing champion the use of research This report outlines the pioneering evidence work of UK and Irish professional bodies in health, teaching and policing. They have been championing research and evaluation in the daily work of more than one million professionals – to improve the lives of patients, pupils and the wider public. Alliance for useful Evidence

        Universities 'in dark' over student mental health needs

        Universities 'in dark' over student mental health needs Universities should be bound by law to meet the mental-health needs of their students, an ex-health minister says.

        Information gathered by Sir Norman Lamb's office reveals a "complex and fragmented" picture of mental-health provision across UK universities.

        Many of the 110 universities which responded said they did not record all relevant key statistics, such as their budgets or waiting times.

        Universities said they could not deal with the issue of mental health alone. BBC News

        Meningitis: 'I'm no longer Miss Independent'

        Meningitis: 'I'm no longer Miss Independent' Life is very different for Lesley Hart since she had meningitis nearly 10 years ago.

        "I'm no longer Miss Independent. It's impacting more and more as time goes on. But I live each day as I want to."

        Lesley is one of nearly 2,500 people who develop bacterial meningitis and meningococcal disease each year in the UK.

        The Meningitis Research Foundation says the right support is key for people like her. BBC News

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        Rugby's Gareth Thomas on HIV: 'I want to break the stigma'

        Rugby's Gareth Thomas on HIV: 'I want to break the stigma' Former Wales rugby captain Gareth Thomas has revealed he is HIV positive, saying he wants to "break the stigma" around the condition.

        He made the announcement as he prepared to compete in the Ironman Wales triathlon in Tenby, Pembrokeshire.

        Thomas said he is taking part to show how people with HIV are misrepresented as "walking around with walking sticks who are close to dying". BBC News

        NHS trusts handing over £205m a year to Government in interest payments as debts mount - iNews

        NHS trusts handing over £205m a year to Government in interest payments as debts mount NHS trusts are handing over more than £205m a year to the Government in interest payments after being forced to take out loans, i can reveal.

        Critics accused the Conservatives of “starving the NHS” by charging unreasonable interest rates on the loans they make to hospitals and other organisations which are struggling to afford their running costs.

        Trusts across England have paid more than £607m to Whitehall in interest over the past five years. The amount paid out is rising every year as NHS debts continue to mount; last year it could have paid the salaries of 7,500 nurses. iNews

        Dishing out more drugs won’t stop the pain. Doctors need new tools

        Dishing out more drugs won’t stop the pain. Doctors need new tools | Ann Robinson As a GP, I know opioids have their place. But we shouldn’t be complacent about a US-style crisis happening in Britain

        Growing concern about the prescription of drugs that cause dependence has been backed up by a recent report from Public Health England (PHE). The agency discovered that in 2017-18, 13% of adults in England received at least one prescription for opioids such as morphine or oxycodone (although this represented a slight downturn in prescribing after a long upward trend). Other drug classes were implicated too, with 25% of adults prescribed one or more of the following drugs: benzodiazepines (such as Valium), z-drugs (sleeping pills such as Zopiclone), gabapentinoids (gabapentin or pregabalin, prescribed for neuropathic pain) or antidepressants.

        The fear is that the UK is following in the footsteps of the US, where overprescribing is said to have led to a full-blown “opioid crisis”. The Guardian

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        UK cancer survival rates are too low – our priorities are all wrong

        UK cancer survival rates are too low – our priorities are all wrong | Mark Dayan Short-termism has hampered investment in equipment and staffing that could help the NHS keep people alive

        Cancer survival rates in the UK have long lagged behind those in other countries of comparable wealth and income levels. And an international study published this week shows that while the UK is making rapid progress, there’s still a big gap in the survival rates cancer patients can expect in Britain compared with countries such as Australia, Canada and Norway.

        The good news is that the outlook for patients suffering from major forms of cancer has got much better. On an age standardised basis, fewer than half of patients with rectal cancer in the UK lived more than five years in 1995. By 2014, more than 60% did. The Guardian

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        NHS bosses tried to 'gag' father of boy whose life was ruined in botched operation

        NHS bosses tried to 'gag' father of boy whose life was ruined in botched operation An NHS hospital effectively paralysed a young boy for life and then tried to “gag” his family from speaking out.

        Bosses at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust threatened legal action unless the child's father watered down his account of the event on the grounds it was “too emotional and too critical”.

        This came after a botched operation to deal with intestinal problems left his two-month-old son, who cannot be named, with catastrophic brain injuries, causing quadriplegic cerebral palsy, blindness and double incontinence. The Daily Telegraph

        Vaping could be a 'ticking time bomb', Chief Medical Officer warns amid growing concerns of e-cigarette risk

        Vaping could be a 'ticking time bomb', Chief Medical Officer warns amid growing concerns of e-cigarette risk England's chief medical officer has raised fears that vaping is “a ticking time bomb” which could do long-term harm, amid growing concern about the safety of e-cigarettes.

        Prof Dame Sally Davies, who will stand down later this month, made the comments just before Donald Trump announced plans to ban flavoured vaping products, in a bid to discourage children from taking up the habit. The Daily Telegraph

        Friday, 13 September 2019

        From eye cancer to HIV and Parkinson's – meet the companies developing smartphone apps set to improve medical diagnostics

        From eye cancer to HIV and Parkinson's – meet the companies developing smartphone apps set to improve medical diagnostics Smartphones have already transformed the way we socialise, work, organise our lives and exercise. Now they are changing the way doctors diagnose and treat disease.
        Around the world, a string of start-ups are harnessing the computing power of the smartphone to put expert medical diagnostic tools and advice in people’s pockets – and relieve the burden on health services. The combination of specialist apps and the computing power packed into a smartphone can deliver a powerful punch.
        As technology is set to make up a greater share of global healthcare spending, which is set to rocket to $10.1tn by 2022 according to a report from Deloitte last year, the potential to transform treatment is greater than ever. Consultants are using a hand-held device called Butterfly iQ, that turns a smartphone into an ultrasound machine, helping slash costs and waiting times. The Telegraph

        Health profile for England: 2019

        Health profile for England: 2019  This report combines data and knowledge with information from other sources to give a broad picture of the health of people in England in 2019. It includes life expectancy, trends in mortality, trends in morbidity and inequalities in health. King's Fund

        Public Health England - publications

        Signs of a slowdown in new type 2 diabetes cases

        Signs of a slowdown in new type 2 diabetes cases The number of new cases of type 2 diabetes could be stabilising, or even falling, a study suggests. The analysis looked at 47 studies from the mid-1960s up to 2014, mainly from the US and Canada and countries across Europe including the UK.
        A third of populations studied between 2006 and 2014 saw a fall in new cases and another third were stable. But Diabetes UK said the challenges of obesity and unhealthy lifestyles, both linked to the condition, remained. BBC News

        NHS facing year-round crisis and cannot cope, warns BMA

        NHS facing year-round crisis and cannot cope, warns BMA  The latest NHS performance figures reinforce the difficult truth that frontline health services are buckling under the strain of relentless demand and NHS staff are coming under unremitting pressure, the NHS Confederation has warned. The British Medical Association said the figures provide the “clearest evidence yet that the NHS cannot cope with the year-round crisis it is now facing”, and called on the government to take urgent action to resolve the crises of doctors’ pensions and tax as these add to the problem by forcing doctors to reduce their working hours.
        The performance figures, published yesterday, reveal that August had the highest-ever recorded figures for A&E attendance, although slightly lower than those for July, as well as the lowest ever proportion of patients treated within 18 weeks of referral. However, the 31-day cancer standard was met. OnMedica

        Cheap booze and fags: the last gasp of government health policy

        Cheap booze and fags: the last gasp of government health policy  In a government gearing up for an election, where every statement is supposed to be choreographed as part of a finely tuned grid of speeches and events, it takes a particular stupidity for the chancellor, Sajid Javid, to extol the virtues of cheap cigarettes and booze just as the health and social care secretary, Matt Hancock, was heading for Public Health England’s annual conference.
        Having alighted upon what he regards as unequivocally good news about leaving the EU without a deal, Javid announced on Tuesday that people travelling to Europe will be able to buy alcohol and cigarettes without paying UK excise duty. The Guardian

        Nearly 100,000 Britons thought to be risking death from hepatitis C

        Nearly 100,000 Britons thought to be risking death from hepatitis C  Almost 100,000 Britons are at risk of dying because they do not know that they have the deadly liver disease hepatitis C, health officials are warning.
        An estimated 95,600 people in the UK, mainly drug users, are believed to be suffering from the disease but are unaware of the condition because they have not been diagnosed, said Public Health England (PHE) on Friday. The Guardian

        Scotland agrees deal for 'unaffordable' cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi

        Scotland agrees deal for 'unaffordable' cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi  The Scottish government has agreed a deal with the manufacturer of Orkambi, the cystic fibrosis drug that NHS England has said is unaffordable for its patients.
        Scotland has not disclosed the price it has agreed to pay to treat 350 patients who are eligible for the drug. In England, there are more than 10,000 children and adults with the disease, nearly half of whom could benefit, making the potential bill south of the border very high. NHS England offered £500m over five years for Orkambi and other upcoming cystic fibrosis drugs, but the manufacturer, Vertex, turned that down. The Guardian

        Cancer patients left in the dark because nurses are 'insanely overloaded'

        Cancer patients left in the dark because nurses are 'insanely overloaded'  Cancer patients are being left in the dark over results because nurses are "insanely overloaded", a new report warns. Polling by Macmillan Cancer Support found almost half of specialist nurses said their high workload was negatively affecting patient care.
        Cancer patients said they had been left with “no idea” when they would get the results of scans to monitor for a relapse, because staff were too busy to attend to them. The charity's study found the cancer workforce is stretched, with around one in 10 specialist nurse posts vacant in some regions. The Telegraph

        One in ten A&E patients is back in casualty within a week

        One in ten A&E patients is back in casualty within a week Almost one in ten Accident & Emergency patients are returning to hospital within a week, amid growing difficulties getting to see a GP. The new figures from NHS Digital show that last year, almost 2 million patients who went to A&E were back again within seven days - a 72 per cent rise from 1.1 million in a decade.
        In total, there were 24.8 million A&E attendances in 2018/19, the figures show - a rise of more than a fifth in a decade. The Telegraph

        Thursday, 12 September 2019

        Body cameras “significantly reduce” aggression on NHS mental health wards

        Body cameras “significantly reduce” aggression on NHS mental health wards All mental health workers for the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) claim to experience incidents of verbal or physical aggression at least once a week, and NHS staff surveys show that these incidents are increasing – a recent survey found that 15% of NHS workers have experienced violence in the past 12 months, which was the highest recorded figure in the past five years.
        However, recent trials of body-worn cameras have shown that the technology can “significantly reduce” the severity of these incidents occurring, helping NHS workers to feel safer while on the job. The latest study, conducted independently by the West London Trust (WLT), saw nursing staff across seven mental health wards in West London provided with 50 cameras to wear during working hours over a four month period.
        The study concluded that while the use of body worn cameras didn’t lead to a significant reduction in the number of incidents, it did help to reduce their seriousness when they did occur. Verdict

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        Food binned at Northampton General Hospital costs NHS £70,000 over five years

        Food binned at Northampton General Hospital costs NHS £70,000 over five years Almost 80,000 meals at Northampton General Hospital have been binned in five years but staff say tonnes of food waste has since been made into renewable energy.A Freedom of Information request submitted to Northampton General Hospital has revealed that 78,365 meals have been thrown away since 2014, which has cost the NHS £72,767.

        The gross cost to provide each inpatient with three meals a day is £2.91 per patient, which NGH says, is below the national NHS benchmark value. Between August 2014 and August 2015 data showed Northampton General Hospital was throwing away the most food at 20,137 meals per year.
        But a spokeswoman for NGH said the hospital has since made improvements to reduce waste by turning it into renewable energy. Northampton Chronicle & Echo

        Revealed: The trusts testing latest round of emergency targets

        Revealed: The trusts testing latest round of emergency targets  New mental health emergency care targets will be trialled across 11 NHS organisations and one social enterprise, NHS England has confirmed.
        The 12 organisations will pilot new clinical standards for urgent and emergency mental healthcare, which include:
        • A one-hour response by liaison psychiatry teams for patients with emergency mental health needs;
        • Assessments for emergency mental health referrals to be carried out “within hours”; and
        • Patients accessing emergency mental health services in the community to be seen within 24 hours.
        The organisations testing the standards include Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. Health Service Journal

        Public Health England launches new infectious disease strategy

        Public Health England launches new infectious disease strategy  The new strategy addresses current and future threats to health, including antibiotic resistance and health inequalities. Public Health England

        NICE wants tailored support for those affected by suicide

        NICE wants tailored support for those affected by suicide People bereaved or affected by a suspected suicide should be given information and offered tailored support, NICE has said. On World Suicide Prevention Day 2019, NICE has published its quality standard on suicide prevention – covering five key ways to reduce suicide and help people bereaved or affected by suicide.
        The Office for National Statistics published data which showed the suicide rate in the UK has risen for the first time since 2013, with 11.2 deaths recorded as suicide per 100,000 people in 2018 - up from 10.1 in 2017. Those who are bereaved or affected by a suspected suicide are themselves at increased risk of suicide.
        Providing support after a suspected suicide can reduce this risk, especially when tailored to the person’s needs. It is important to identify people who may need support as soon as possible so that they can be given practical information and access support if, and when, they need to. NICE

        NHS to open specialist FGM support clinics across England

        NHS to open specialist FGM support clinics across England  The NHS is opening female genital mutilation support clinics across England that will allow survivors to access expert care and treatment earlier. More than 1,300 women are expected to benefit from the highly specialised FGM support being rolled out in Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds and five boroughs in London, according to NHS England.
        Women who have had FGM often first come into contact with NHS services after they become pregnant. The eight new centres aim to reach a broader group of women, particularly those who are younger and not pregnant, to provide swift support and treatment.
        The clinics will be led by specialist doctors, midwives and nurses, and provide access to specially trained counsellors for emotional support, as well as FGM health advocates for advice on accessing other services locally. The Guardian

        Britain to use millions of NHS patients' histories to seek cures

        Britain to use millions of NHS patients' histories to seek cures Britain is about to start using information about millions of NHS patients’ medical histories to boost the search for cures for ailments such as cancer, asthma and mental illness. Seven new “data hubs” are set to revolutionise medical research by giving doctors, scientists and academics access to unprecedented data about who gets ill in the first place and who responds best to treatment.
        However, the move is likely to raise anxiety about possible breaches of patients’ privacy and also the commercialisation of patient records because drug companies are among those with whom the data will be shared. The Guardian

        NHS hospital trusts to pay out further £55bn under PFI scheme

        NHS hospital trusts to pay out further £55bn under PFI scheme Some spending one-sixth of entire budget on repaying debts from Blair-era policy. NHS hospital trusts are being crippled by the private finance initiative and will have to make another £55bn in payments by the time the last contract ends in 2050, a report reveals.
        An initial £13bn of private sector-funded investment in new hospitals will end up costing the NHS in England a staggering £80bn by the time all contracts come to an end, the IPPR thinktank has found. The Guardian

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        Britain slumps to bottom of cancer survival league tables – and is two decades behind some countries

        Britain slumps to bottom of cancer survival league tables – and is two decades behind some countries
        Britain is bottom of international league tables for cancer survival – and is lagging two decades behind some countries for some types of disease – a global study shows. The research on almost four million patients by the World Health Organisation (WHO) shows improvements have failed to keep pace with those in other comparable countries.
        The 20 year study shows that patients in Britain have the lowest survival rates for five out of seven common cancers. Despite improvements across all countries, the UK’s relative position now is significantly worse than when the study started in the 90s, when it fared worst for three out of seven cancers. Britain is now bottom of the table for bowel, lung, stomach pancreatic and rectal cancer, second worst for oesophageal disease and in third worst position for ovarian cancer. The Telegraph

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        Social media linked to increased risk of mental health problems

        Social media linked to increased risk of mental health problems  Teenagers who spend more than three hours a day on social media may have double the risk of mental health problems as those who shun it, research suggests. The study of more than 6,000 children aged 12 to 15 found those who used social media more heavily were more likely to report issues such as depression, anxiety and loneliness, as well as aggression and anti-social behaviour, than teenagers who did not use social media.
        The findings held true even when researchers took into account mental health problems experienced by any young person in the year before they were asked about social media use. The research, from a team at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Maryland, was published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. The Telegraph

        NHS agrees to fund drug for children with incurable disease, after High Court threat  

        NHS agrees to fund drug for children with incurable disease, after High Court threat   The NHS has agreed to fund a drug for children with a rare degenerative disease – weeks before families were due to go to court. Two sets of parents of children with Batten disease had been prepared to take their fight for the drug cerliponase alfa (Brineura) to the High Court.
        NHS England announced on Wednesday that an agreement on price had been struck with the drug's manufacturer Biomarin. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) had previously said it could not be certain the drug was value for money.The Telegraph

        Wednesday, 11 September 2019

        New parents need space to talk about their mental health

        New parents need space to talk about their mental health A report by Healthwatch says new parents need more support to deal with mental health problems during and after pregancy. Healthwatch

        'Football saved my life' after breakdown

        'Football saved my life' after breakdown In the UK, suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50, according to the Office for National Statistics.

        After losing two male friends to suicide, Rob Moss set up RammyMen in the former mill town of Ramsbottom, Lancashire, to engage local men in activities that would help with depression. BBC News - Health

        Many hospital patients get no visitors

        Many hospital patients get no visitors Two-fifths (40%) of patients on UK hospital wards get no visitors, say the NHS nurses who care for them.

        The Royal Voluntary Service charity commissioned a poll of 200 nurses working in acute hospitals in Britain. As well as being socially isolating, having no visitor to help with the "small" things, such as cutting up food or refilling a water glass, can delay a patient's recovery, the nurses say.  They want more people to become volunteer visitors and helpers. BBC News - Health

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        Guidance: Healthier weight conversations: support for professionals

        Guidance: Healthier weight conversations: support for professionals It describes the intent of professional organisations to work together, support and enable the public health workforce to have healthier weight conversations and maximise population behaviour change, helping individuals and communities significantly reduce their risk of obesity, in order to support the national ambition to
        halve childhood obesity rates by 2030. Gov.UK

        NHS pension shake-up unveiled to tackle 'tax trap' staffing crisis

        NHS pension shake-up unveiled to tackle 'tax trap' staffing crisis Operations being cancelled as medics turn down work to avoid risk of massive bills

        Ministers have unveiled a major overhaul of the NHS pension scheme to try to stop doctors cutting their hours in order to avoid falling into a “tax trap” that means they face bills for as much as £100,000.

        Matt Hancock, the health secretary, said the changes meant “every senior clinician will be able to carry out life-saving work for patients, safe in the knowledge they have more control over their pension, their future and their retirement than at any point in NHS history.” The Guardian

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        New strain of toxin-producing strep A emerges in UK

        New strain of toxin-producing strep A emerges in UK A new strain of group A streptococcus, which is able to produce significantly more toxin, is spreading in England and Wales, scientists say.
        Strep A causes a range of infections, from a sore throat to scarlet fever. The new strain's emergence, reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, coincides with a rise in rare but potentially deadly invasive infections.
        However, it does not explain the mysterious surge in scarlet fever cases during the past five years. And there is no direct evidence the new strain causes more serious infection than other strains, experts say. BBC News - Health

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        NHS regulation and oversight: a time of transition

        NHS regulation and oversight: a time of transition NHS Providers - This report outlines the findings from a survey on regulation and explores trusts' experiences of regulation over the last twelve months. It reveals that only 39 per cent of NHS trust leaders think the overall regulatory approach adopted by NHS England, NHS Improvement and the Care Quality Commission is working well. It also highlights the growing tension between the current system of regulation which focuses on organisations and ambition to move towards an approach which takes system working into account. King's Fund: Health Management and Policy Alert

        Corporate report: PHE Strategy 2020 to 2025

        Corporate report: PHE Strategy 2020 to 2025 The PHE Strategy 2020 to 2025 sets out how Public Health England will work to protect and improve the public’s health and reduce health inequalities over the next 5 years.

        It outlines PHE’s role within the public health system, 10 priorities where PHE will focus particular effort and the areas where PHE will build capability within the organisation to support delivery of its strategic objectives and wider activities. Gov.UK

        Bacteria developing new ways to resist antibiotics, doctors warn

        Bacteria developing new ways to resist antibiotics, doctors warn Scientists in UK identify growing trend that threatens to leave patients untreatable

        Bacteria are increasingly developing ways of resisting antibiotics, threatening a future in which patients could become untreatable, doctors have warned.

        Over the last decade scientists in the UK studying samples from patients have identified 19 new mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. The Guardian

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        Tuesday, 10 September 2019

        Beauty salon to start make-up classes for cancer patients in Kettering

        Beauty salon to start make-up classes for cancer patients in Kettering
        Bellissimo Beauty and Training Academy is planning to start brow classes for chemotheraphy patients who have lost their hair but cannot get semi-permanent make-up.

        Owner of The Yards-based salon, Jade, is planning to offer the classes to people undergoing chemotherapy after her friend and her aunt lost their hair during cancer treatment. Northamptonshire Telegraph

        Prescription drug dependency worrying - health chiefs

        Prescription drug dependency worrying - health chiefs
        Hundreds of thousands of people in England are getting hooked on prescription drugs, health chiefs fear.

        A Public Health England review looked at the use of strong painkillers, antidepressants and sleeping tablets - used by a quarter of adults every year.

        It found that at the end of March 2018 half of people using these drugs had been on them for at least 12 months. BBC News

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        Midwives urge the Government to scrap NHS charges for foreign pregnant women

        Midwives urge the Government to scrap NHS charges for foreign pregnant women Midwives are urging the Government to scrap NHS charges for foreign pregnant women on the grounds that they are potentially harmful to mothers and babies.

        The Royal College of Midwives says its members are being forced to carry out 'racial profiling' when establishing who is eligible for free care.

        The organisation - which represents 47,000 midwives - is expected to formally adopt a policy calling for the suspension of charges at their conference later today. Mail Online

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        NHS Appoints England’s First Chief Midwife

        NHS Appoints England’s First Chief Midwife To help improve maternity care and promote safer births, the National Health Service (NHS) has appointed Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent as England’s first chief midwife. Dunkley-Bent, a visiting professor at Kings College London and London South Bank University, previously served as head of maternity, children, and young children for NHS England and has had a long career in the NHS as a midwife and nurse. The Commonwealth Fund

        No-deal Brexit could send NHS 'toppling over the edge' - Personnel Today

        No-deal Brexit could send NHS 'toppling over the edge' A no-deal Brexit would send the NHS – “our nation’s greatest institution” – into a state of chaos, health service union Unison has warned.

        Severe shortages of drugs and medical equipment, coupled with increased waiting times and cancelled operations, would push services “over the edge”, said Unison general secretary David Prentis, who yesterday joined NHS staff pulling a mock-up of a hospital away from the sea front in Brighton, where the TUC annual conference began yesterday. Personnel Today

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        Messaging app could save NHS £44 million annually, says study - pharmaphorum

        Messaging app could save NHS £44 million annually, says study An app-based clinical messaging tool created by NHS doctors could save the NHS £44 million a year, according to a new study.

        The Kent Surrey Sussex Academic Health Science Network (AHSN) conducted an in-depth investigation into the impact of Forward, a smartphone app which helps NHS workers exchange patient information, make clinical decisions and manage their workload.

        Created by junior doctors, the app was designed as an alternative to the cumbersome use of pagers and landlines on hospital wards, replacing them with a safe bespoke app for clinical staff. Pharmaphorum

        New blood test trialled on 12,000 Scots catches lung cancer early

        New blood test trialled on 12,000 Scots catches lung cancer early A new blood test can detect if a person has lung cancer before symptoms ever develop, research has shown.

        Experts carried out a random controlled trial on more than 12,000 people in Scotland who were at high risk of developing the disease.

        They found people who took the test were more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at an early stage.

        Chief investigator, Prof Frank Sullivan, said the findings could have "globally significant implications".

        Experts hope the test will now be rolled out across Scotland and beyond. BBC News

        Monday, 9 September 2019

        Hospital expressing room for Northampton mums with premature babies given £7,000 face lift

        Hospital expressing room for Northampton mums with premature babies given £7,000 face lift Northampton General Hospital's expressing room has been given a revamp to make new mums feel more comfortable.

        In September last year Gosset ward staff circulated a questionnaire to new mums at NGH to get their feedback on changes they wanted to see made to the expressing room. Northampton Chronicle and Echo

        Northamptonshire schoolboys to be offered vaccine that could 'eliminate cervical cancer'


        Northamptonshire schoolboys to be offered vaccine that could 'eliminate cervical cancer' Boys returning to secondary school in Year 8 will be offered the human papillomavirus (HPV) injections for the first time, 11 years after the vaccination scheme was introduced for girls.
        Girls have been offered the HPV vaccine in schools since 2008 to help protect against a common group of viruses that can cause cancers including cervical cancer, mouth and throat cancers, and cancer of the anal and genital areas.

        The vaccine is given in the form of two injections. The first one is administered when girls and boys are aged 12 and 13, followed by a second injection between six to 12 months later. Northampton Chronicle and Echo

        Heartbreaking loss of twins drives couple to raise funds for KGH

        Heartbreaking loss of twins drives couple to raise funds for KGH A couple who lost their twin girls in the space of three devastating weeks are raising funds for a new bereavement suite at KGH.

        Chloe and Chris Turner's daughters Alice and Amelia were prematurely born at 24 weeks at the Rothwell Road hospital on June 3 last year. Northamptonshire Telegraph

        £1 million to help NHS reclaim debts from overseas visitors

        £1 million to help NHS reclaim debts from overseas visitors Plans to expand the team of cost-recovery experts will help recover millions of pounds in costs for treating overseas visitors in the NHS. Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock has announced plans to expand the NHS’s existing team of cost-recovery experts, backed by £1 million.

        Since 2018, a dedicated team of cost-recovery experts has been established to work with trusts. The expansion of this team will help the NHS to reclaim outstanding debts from overseas visitors who are required to pay for their care. Gov.UK

        Dental statistics broken down by practice for the first time

        Dental statistics broken down by practice for the first time The latest statistics about patients treated by NHS dentists are broken down to dental practice level for the first time. The report from NHS Digital shows that half of all adults in England saw an NHS dentist in the two years to June 2019, a slight decrease on the same period to June 2018. NHS Networks

        Strengthen muscles as well as heart to stay fit and healthy, say top doctors

        Strengthen muscles as well as heart to stay fit and healthy, say top doctors Adults are advised to do muscle-strengthening exercises twice a week, as well as aerobic exercise, to help them stay active for longer, under new guidance from the UK's top doctors.

        For the first time, it includes advice on safe activity levels for pregnant women and new mums. Dance, bowls or Tai Chi are advised for over-65s to reduce falls in old age. Physical activity protects against obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and depression, the advice says.

        The new guidelines on physical activity have been produced by the UK's chief medical officers and updated to reflect the latest scientific evidence. BBC News - Health

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